supply chain – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 23:48:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cacaovm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-150x150.png supply chain – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ 32 32 Saudi Arabia-based Qawafel raises $3m funding round https://cacaovm.org/saudi-arabia-based-qawafel-raises-3m-funding-round/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 07:20:31 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/saudi-arabia-based-qawafel-raises-3m-funding-round/ Qawafel in Saudi Arabia, a B2B marketplace facilitating exchanges between buyers and suppliers of perishable food products across the Kingdom, has closed its first investment round (Seed) of $3 million, co-led by AlSayed Group and Khwarizmi Ventures, in addition to a number of angel investors. Qawafel is a B2B technology company connecting suppliers with various […]]]>

Qawafel in Saudi Arabia, a B2B marketplace facilitating exchanges between buyers and suppliers of perishable food products across the Kingdom, has closed its first investment round (Seed) of $3 million, co-led by AlSayed Group and Khwarizmi Ventures, in addition to a number of angel investors.

Qawafel is a B2B technology company connecting suppliers with various buyers and outlets in the confectionery and chilled goods market. It provides integrated technical solutions aimed at improving the fragmented wholesale market through a comprehensive B2B platform and digital services, providing a seamless user experience for customers and suppliers when managing operations. This in turn helps to promote local production and increase the efficiency of market supply chains through seamless last mile delivery and payment collection.

Based in Riyadh, Qawafel started its confectionery business in the last quarter of 2020 by co-founders Turki AlAyyad (CEO), Walid Al-Ghobain (Chief Partnership Officer) and Qays Bahurmuz (Chief Product & Technology Officer ). Today, Qawafel serves over 5,000 outlets in over 188 cities and towns in Saudi Arabia and has maintained a sales growth rate of 30% per month; a testament to unfailing customer experience and trust.

Mr. Turki AlAyyad, CEO of Qawafel, commented in this regard saying, “Qawafel started in the confectionery and chocolate market, where sales are estimated at 5 billion Saudi riyals per year, and acquired about 1 % of said market in a short period of 500 tons of chocolate were transformed and circulated in the cities of the Kingdom. Our goal is to grow vertically in the confectionery industry in general, where annual sales exceed 20 billion Saudi Riyals.

Qawafel provides a “market data” service which aims to help and support small factories in the process of creating and innovating new products. The company has successfully activated more than 300 local factories, which has helped to increase the average order rate in these factories. Qawafel plans to use the financing in the operation and growth of its business, R&D to improve and create new products and services, as well as to enter new sectors and markets by the end of 2022, such as the frozen food industry.

“Qawafel’s vision is to provide the technical and logistical solutions needed to move the wholesale chilled food market to e-commerce, and to enable small family businesses and store owners to grow and be present in many In achieving this, Qawafel aims to support locally produced products and help improve aspects related to national food security,” added Turki AlAyyad.

Abdulaziz Al-Turki, Managing Partner at Khwarizmi Ventures, added: “The HoReCa space is showing steady growth and high activity. Turki and the Qawafel team are working hard to defragment the wholesale confectionery market, make supply chain management easier for buyers and suppliers, and create significant positive local impact.

-Ends-

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Dominican cocoa supplier raises seed money https://cacaovm.org/dominican-cocoa-supplier-raises-seed-money/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 14:10:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/dominican-cocoa-supplier-raises-seed-money/ Founded by Dominican American sisters Janett and Erika Liriano, Inaru is reinventing the cocoa supply chain. The startup has raised $1.5 million in seed capital from technology, venture and impact funds to build a vertically integrated ecosystem for organic cocoa production in the Dominican Republic. Inaru established an inclusive business model to empower producers through […]]]>

Founded by Dominican American sisters Janett and Erika Liriano, Inaru is reinventing the cocoa supply chain. The startup has raised $1.5 million in seed capital from technology, venture and impact funds to build a vertically integrated ecosystem for organic cocoa production in the Dominican Republic.

Inaru established an inclusive business model to empower producers through profit sharing and overhauling outdated farming practices that have limited cocoa production capacity in the Dominican Republic, according to its founders. The company has provided organic certification to over 300 farmers, with a waiting list of another 1,800, and secured exclusive contracts for 500 tons of cocoa. Inaru said it would use the funding to complete the construction of a warehouse and the installation of a cocoa refinery this year, with plans to produce semi-finished and finished products entirely for the export market.

“Inaru can really prove beyond any potential doubt that farmers are getting what they are owed,” says Janett Liriano, Managing Director.

Looking ahead, Inaru’s founders want to apply its model to the coffee industry with the aim of “reframing commodities as essential foundational goods,” she says.

Investors include The Helm, 1517 Fund, MarsBio VC, West Ventures, Gaingels, Sorenson Impact Foundation and executives from companies including The Hershey Co., Soylent, Unity Technologies and Robolox.

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Dominican Cocoa Supplier Secures Seed Funding https://cacaovm.org/dominican-cocoa-supplier-secures-seed-funding/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 15:10:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/dominican-cocoa-supplier-secures-seed-funding/ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC — Founded by Dominican American sisters Janett and Erika Liriano, Inaru is reinventing the cocoa supply chain. The startup has raised $1.5 million in seed capital from technology, venture and impact funds to build a vertically integrated ecosystem for organic cocoa production in the Dominican Republic. Inaru established an inclusive business model to […]]]>

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC — Founded by Dominican American sisters Janett and Erika Liriano, Inaru is reinventing the cocoa supply chain. The startup has raised $1.5 million in seed capital from technology, venture and impact funds to build a vertically integrated ecosystem for organic cocoa production in the Dominican Republic.

Inaru established an inclusive business model to empower producers through profit sharing and overhauling outdated farming practices that have limited cocoa production capacity in the Dominican Republic, according to its founders. The company has provided organic certification to over 300 farmers, with a waiting list of another 1,800, and secured exclusive contracts for 500 tonnes of cocoa. Inaru said it would use the funding to complete the construction of a warehouse and the installation of a cocoa refinery this year, with plans to produce semi-finished and finished products entirely for the export market.

“Inaru can really prove beyond any potential doubt that farmers are getting what they are owed,” said Janett Liriano, Managing Director.

Looking ahead, Inaru’s founders want to apply its model to the coffee industry with the aim of “reframing commodities as essential fundamental goods”, she said.

Investors include The Helm, 1517 Fund, MarsBio VC, West Ventures, Gaingels, Sorenson Impact Foundation and executives from companies including The Hershey Co., Soylent, Unity Technologies and Robolox.

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Ashland, Hallstar, Xi’an B-Thriving I/E Co. – Materials Handling https://cacaovm.org/ashland-hallstar-xian-b-thriving-i-e-co-materials-handling/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 11:50:56 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/ashland-hallstar-xian-b-thriving-i-e-co-materials-handling/ New Jersey, United States, The Global cocoa bean extract market The research report provides qualitative and quantitative information related to industry growth rate, market segmentation, market size, demand and revenue of Cocoa Bean Extract. The study effectively incorporates a balanced qualitative and quantitative analysis of the overall Cocoa Bean Extract market that branches into individual […]]]>

New Jersey, United States, The Global cocoa bean extract market The research report provides qualitative and quantitative information related to industry growth rate, market segmentation, market size, demand and revenue of Cocoa Bean Extract. The study effectively incorporates a balanced qualitative and quantitative analysis of the overall Cocoa Bean Extract market that branches into individual component elements supported by a similar analytical approach. The study report is integrated with a future forecast as the focal point of the research with all the analytical data directed towards the growth projections and market estimations representing the Cocoa Bean Extract market report.

The Global Cocoa Seed Extract Market 2022 study provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Global Cocoa Bean Extract Market report is provided for the international market along with development trends, competitive environment analysis, and key regions development status. It discusses development policies and plans and also analyzes manufacturing processes and cost structures. The historical information collected for this study contributes to the growth of international, federal and regional companies.

We have recent updates from Cocoa Bean Extract market in a sample [email protected] https://www.stratagemmarketinsights.com/sample/100259

Supplier landscape and profiling:
Ashland, Hallstar, Xi’an B-Thriving I/E Co., Ltd., Nature’s Nurture, Xi’an DN Biology Co., Ltd.

Market by type
Liquid, Solid

Market by Application
Foods, skin care products, others

The research paper focuses on the qualitative aspects relying on the factors to theoretically ground the growth-related predictions. Assessing the most important driving factors and their influence on scales and growth patterns allows for an accurate estimation of potential opportunities. On the other hand, a precise assessment of the major restraining factors highlights the key aspects of the industry limiting the growth rate of the Cocoa Bean Extract Market. furthermore, the study examines the recent industry trends and popularizes the megatrends of varying nature by understanding their exact impact on the Cocoa Bean Extract market growth in terms of revenue and demand increase.

Global Cocoa Bean Extract Market: Regional Segments:

The various sections on regional segmentation give the regional aspects of the global Cocoa Bean Extract market. This chapter describes the regulatory structure that may have an impact on the overall market. It highlights the political landscape in the market and predicts its influence on the global Cocoa Bean Extract market.

North America (US, Canada)
Europe (Germany, UK, France, rest of Europe)
Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, Rest of Asia-Pacific)
Latin America (Brazil, Mexico)
Middle East and Africa

To request a pre-order, please click on the link [email protected] https://www.stratagemmarketinsights.com/quiry/100259

Drivers and constraints:

Increase financial constraints to stimulate growth: The growth of the global cocoa bean extract market is expected to increase, driven by industry demand. On the contrary, lack of awareness among people in countries with weaker economies is likely to hamper the growth of the market, leading to reduced adoption of cocoa bean extract.

Key points to remember:

• It details the market size, market share by value and market share by volume of key players and the global market as a whole.
• The innovation in technologies, value propositions, products, and services offered in the Cocoa Bean Extract market are detailed.
• The profound business challenges faced by the market leaders and the significant factors resulting therefrom are detailed in the research study.
• The report provides information on a variety of interrelated developments that have taken place in the cocoa bean extract market over the past decade and their impact on the future.
• This research-based literature draws on various data triangulation methodologies and international research best practices.
• The research is validated through interviews with a range of cocoa bean extract business leaders, as well as subject matter experts.

Why choose Stratagem Market Insights?

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You can buy full [email protected] https://www.stratagemmarketinsights.com/cart/100259

Contact us:

Mr Shah
Stratagem Market Overview
Tel: USA +1-415-871-0703
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E-mail: [email protected]

– MN

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ReHarvest Provisions secures $1.5 million seed investment https://cacaovm.org/reharvest-provisions-secures-1-5-million-seed-investment/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/reharvest-provisions-secures-1-5-million-seed-investment/ Denver, Colorado. — Mission-driven food startup reHarvest Provisions has announced that it has closed a $1.5 million funding round led by True Wealth Ventures, an early-stage venture capital firm focused on led businesses. by women who improve human and/or environmental health. Flagstaff Ventures, Segal Ventures, Captra Capital, Chicago Early, Dobson Avenue and CPG Focus Angels […]]]>

Denver, Colorado. Mission-driven food startup reHarvest Provisions has announced that it has closed a $1.5 million funding round led by True Wealth Ventures, an early-stage venture capital firm focused on led businesses. by women who improve human and/or environmental health. Flagstaff Ventures, Segal Ventures, Captra Capital, Chicago Early, Dobson Avenue and CPG Focus Angels are also participating in the round.

This announcement follows the announcement that reHarvest Provisions has changed its name from its former name, reBLEND. CEO and Founder of ReHarvest Provisions, Kathryn Bernell, recently relaunched her line of upcycled superfood smoothies as ReHarvest Provisions as the first in an extensive portfolio of products that are better for you and better for the planet. With a mission to provide irresistible, mindful, and practical ways to get more whole fruits and vegetables into our diets, the rebrand maintains a commitment to health and sustainability.

Along with the name change came a redesign of packaging highlighting the origins of ingredients and highlighting reHarvest’s main differentiator – recycled whole fruits and vegetables (vs. concentrates, purees, flavors or processed additives). ReHarvest Provisions will continue to work with manufacturers and farmers to source, purchase and recycle unnecessarily discarded and neglected products and by-products that would otherwise go to waste.

“We have big plans and a lot of work ahead of us,” Bernell said. “I built this business from the ground up and am excited to build our momentum into this next chapter of growth. Our rebranding sets the stage for us to be an iconic brand that consumers know and love, and our investment round fuels our ability to expand our reach while driving meaningful change in consumers’ lives and the supply chain. food supply that we rely on. Specifically, the capital will support key brand hires, physical retail expansion, brand amplification investments and the innovation pipeline.

“We are thrilled to partner with a powerful brand founded and led by women that is leading the way into the future of food and sustainability,” said Kerry Rupp, Managing Partner of True Wealth Ventures. “We look forward to seeing what comes next for reHarvest Provisions as they expand their portfolio, increase distribution and introduce new innovations.”

ReHarvest Provisions pops are currently available on reharvest.co and Amazon, and will soon replace reBLEND on Thrive Market, Imperfect Produce, Misfits, FreshDirect, and Sunbasket.

About the provisions of reHarvest

Founded in 2017, reHarvest Provisions is a women-founded, mission-driven company committed to providing consumers with simple ways to live healthy. ReHarvest Provisions’ first product in their growing portfolio is a line of appetizing, mindful and convenient upcycled superfood smoothies made with whole fruits and vegetables. reHarvest Provisions has partnered with Kroger’s Zero Waste Fund, Barilla’s Blu 1877 Venture Fund, is sold nationally with Thrive Market, QVC, Fresh Direct, Amazon (a top 5 frozen juice brand) and has been featured in Forbes as one of their next 1000 startups!

About True Wealth Ventures

True Wealth Ventures is an early-stage venture capital firm led by two Austin-based women, Sara Brand and Kerry Rupp. The fund focuses on women-led businesses that improve human and/or environmental health. Their investment thesis is that women-led businesses perform better financially, as shown in numerous studies, but are an untapped market with less than 2% of venture capital dollars going to female-led start-ups. women and about 12% to those with only one wife. member of the founding team in 2020. The company was selected in the ImpactAssets 50 2021 as an Emerging Impact Manager, a global list of impact fund managers across all sectors and asset classes.

For more information:
https://reharvest.co/

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Mary Lowther Column; Mark the Seasons with Seed Catalogs – Lake Cowichan Gazette https://cacaovm.org/mary-lowther-column-mark-the-seasons-with-seed-catalogs-lake-cowichan-gazette/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 19:45:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/mary-lowther-column-mark-the-seasons-with-seed-catalogs-lake-cowichan-gazette/ Is it just me, or is time just meaningless? There were definable seasons, but now they all seem to work together, starting and ending (if applicable) not on specific dates as much as market share. It’s bad enough when the cable channels put on “Christmas in July” and Santa Claus starts throwing soft drinks before […]]]>

Is it just me, or is time just meaningless? There were definable seasons, but now they all seem to work together, starting and ending (if applicable) not on specific dates as much as market share. It’s bad enough when the cable channels put on “Christmas in July” and Santa Claus starts throwing soft drinks before Halloween, but now I get my spring seed catalogs before winter becomes official!

One is from Johnny’s Seeds, and I have never ordered from them, although I may have contacted them last year while looking for witloof chicory. They sent out a terrific catalog but they’re in Maine and have a $ 10 delivery charge and when I need seeds that I haven’t grown myself I like to buy local. I prefer local growers because their seeds were developed in and for my climate, and don’t need to travel that far. I also like supporting local businesses because when the supply chain becomes an issue, we will be happy to have them nearby.

Despite its early arrival, the seed catalog season is upon us, our annual reminder that it is time to take stock of our seeds and see what is still viable and what needs to be achieved. I’m starting by checking Salt Spring Seeds online to see what they have this year. I don’t wait for Seedy Saturday in February, because I like to know what seeds I have before. That way when I go to Seedy Saturday the pressure is released and I can have fun looking for things I didn’t know I wanted.

Before that, however, I have my own seed. On each package, kept or purchased, I write the date of sowing and the year until which they are still viable. Before sowing each crop, I test the viability of the seeds by sprinkling a few on a damp paper towel to see how many sprouts and how long it takes; if only half germinate, I will sow twice as much and I will not use that seed again.

I store the sorted seed packets in airtight plastic jars that once held chocolate ice cream. FYI, I didn’t buy it. I have more self-discipline than David and in addition, I prefer vanilla. The stuff is very bad for David, so I eat it to keep him from succumbing to temptation. Also, I need the containers.

I throw all the desiccant packets I bought in supplement bottles and Taiwanese tea bags in each jar, but I suspect that dried breadcrumbs would work just as well. The seeds last longer when stored in a cool, dry place so I save space in my lovely cold pantry. Have I already mentioned how much I love my pantry? Every house should have one, especially when there are gardeners living there, but we are getting ahead of ourselves. Pantry is something we traditionally discuss later in the year, and Ecclesiastes is right.

Last year we started growing garlic on a large scale, using seeds from a number of local growers. Since local seeds are adapted to our climate, it is always best to find a local source. This section invites any local producer with a catalog to send it to mary_lowther@yahoo.ca. I am always looking for new ideas.

Column gardening

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Culture Collective’s pop-up shops are up and running, but sellers face challenges https://cacaovm.org/culture-collectives-pop-up-shops-are-up-and-running-but-sellers-face-challenges/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/culture-collectives-pop-up-shops-are-up-and-running-but-sellers-face-challenges/ For the first time in the city’s history, Madison opened pop-up shops on State Street aimed at providing businesses owned by people of color with premium retail space. Culture Collective Pop-Up Shop vendors include: Ardoposh; better prints; DK Shop; El Legado; Productions of intuition; Madame Chu’s Delights; Walk-Isa Co; Nobbits United States; laughter of the […]]]>

For the first time in the city’s history, Madison opened pop-up shops on State Street aimed at providing businesses owned by people of color with premium retail space.

Culture Collective Pop-Up Shop vendors include: Ardoposh; better prints; DK Shop; El Legado; Productions of intuition; Madame Chu’s Delights; Walk-Isa Co; Nobbits United States; laughter of the oceans; OnlyOne Photography; and Restoration and Body Care Soap. The Pop Up Shops are located at 440 and 444 State Street.

Saran Ouk, Office of Business Resource Manager for Madison, was new to her job when this program was created. Ouk helped and partnered with Chambers to create this pop-up store program for underrepresented business owners in Madison.

“When I started my role, you know, my manager was like hey, there were pop-up conversations,” Ouk said. “I just kind of took it upon myself to move forward with whatever was discussed. And then, with the darkrooms and Latinos already in the conversation, I thought we should also bring in the Hmong chamber. They’re statewide and they’re a CDFI (Community Development Financial Institution) with lending power that could help small businesses. That’s kind of how it all started then with the three ethnic chambers and the city that came together to create this program of pop-up shops.”

This program is a collaboration between the City of Madison, JD McCormick Properties, Hmong Wisconsin Chamber of Commerce, Dane County Latino Chamber of Commerce, Madison Black Chamber of Commerce, and Madison’s Central Business Improvement District.

“This is probably the first time I would say Madison has worked with three ethnic chambers to launch a program like this,” Ouk said. “It’s something I’m very proud of. That we were able to work with three color chambers because we wanted to make sure we provided those opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. And working with chambers that work, you know, in the community, and they work with these companies. I think it was just fine instead of the government trying to figure out who the sellers are. It was a great partnership with the chambers.

The program was not an immediate success for all providers. Sarah Denise Peeler, owner of Ocean’s Laugh, runs a business that sells flower bath kits and jars. Peeler said she was grateful for the opportunity, but it was a bit difficult at first.

Sarah Denise Peeler, owner of Ocean’s Laugh. Photo by Angelica Euseary.

“What I will say is it’s a great experience because I’m ready to make it great,” Peeler said. “I understand that as a minority people can see something they really like in the window, but once they see me, oh they keep walking. As I show up every day here in this space, this opportunity is for me. I think it’s very important. It’s important to show up and be present in those moments. To show up in these spaces (which) otherwise we probably couldn’t even afford to be there. We must remain encouraged. You know, I’ve been sitting here for a few days and the sales are pretty low. But I’m not going to allow that to stop me from growing my business and building my brand.

Allison Aguilar Bultman is the Cultural Collectives Vendor Support Coordinator. Bultman is here to support sellers and cultivate community among them as they navigate this experience. She understands that State Street is a predominantly white space in Madison and is doing what she can to help sellers during this time.

“And that’s really part of my role as a support coordinator, to make sure they feel heard,” Bultman said. “And create an environment where they all feel able to support each other, because all of these vendors in these stores are also our people of color. They go through this together. They are the ones who really share this experience and who are there for each other. It’s uncomfortable. Even at the grand opening we had a large group of people and diverse people as well. That’s not always the case, if you were to walk down State Street Monday through Thursday. But again, it’s such an opportunity for these sellers to lean into the question and say, “Where do I want my business to be located and how can I still share my culture and my passion for what am I doing in these spaces that are mostly white??’”

Josey Chu, owner of Mrs Chu, runs a business that offers artisanal products specializing in Southeast Asian delicacies. Chu is not new to State Street. As a student at UW-Madison, Chu spent a lot of time on State Street with friends. She recognizes the changes in the environment since the pandemic and understands how it has affected State Street and local businesses.

Josey Chu, owner of Madame Chu. Photo by Angelica Euseary.

“So I have to say State Street from when I went to UW-Madison and now is a 90 degree difference, I wouldn’t say a 180,” Chu said. “Because State Street when I was going to UW Madison, it was a place where at 1 a.m., right after we went to comedy clubs, and as college students, we were hanging out on the patio and then walked down State Street looking for places to eat, browse shops and buy gifts. He doesn’t have that charm anymore because of what we’ve been through. The pandemic and the riots and the whole shutdown of State Street. So since then, it seems like it’s been really tough for State Street to recover.

Although Chu understands the reality of State Street, she appreciates this opportunity presented to be able to participate in the cultural collectives.

“I feel like Culture Collectives is an opportunity, it’s a place that really shows where the city would like to move forward, along State Street,” Chu said. “And it’s about bringing back the diversity of cultures and ethnicities, and showing support. More importantly, it’s about showing the city of Madison (and) the state of Wisconsin, that retail , brick and mortar, even though it’s tough and going through a rebound. But by supporting local small businesses in this retail program, it can actually help the economy bounce back. Because it’s an opportunity for small businesses to be unaware of the supply chain issues we constantly hear in the media.There are all these products waiting to be delivered to the door.If you get products through from a local supplier, you really don’t have the supply chain problem. That’s what I wanted to make the point that the city, the chambers, the state of Wisconsin, promoting local small businesses, can really bring the economy back. We can bounce back and not encounter this supply chain problem.

This program offered business owners the opportunity to put their products on State Street. It also allowed the Hmong Chamber of Commerce to collaborate with other chambers and the city of Madison. Maysee Herr, Executive Director of the Hmong Chamber of Commerce, spoke about the importance of collaborating on this project and the impacts it will have on communities of color in Madison.

“To see what it’s like to be on State Street, not many of them have had that experience,” Herr said. “So that’s a lesson for everyone involved. And also, they can see if they can see themselves on the state street along the line. If their products could sell there. Or if that is not what they want so it’s a good experience for everyone and I would also say as far as the Hmong House is concerned it gives us the opportunity to meet one of the small businesses from diverse backgrounds.

The Culture Collectives bring something new and exciting to State Street. It is exciting for business owners to engage in this opportunity and expand their customer base. This program is an opportunity to create a truly diverse State Street for all Madisonians.

“I really thank all the chambers for being able to work together,” Chu said. “The Hmong Chamber, the Latino Chamber, the Black Chamber and the City of Madison come together and can really work together to provide us with this opportunity. The Cultural Collectives are also an opportunity for me to meet other product manufacturers. In my space, I was able to meet the owner of Nobbits USA. I met the owner of Ocean’s Laugh. In addition, next door are all the other owners of beautiful shops. We are able to talk about business, successes, failures and what we look forward to.

As the holiday season approaches, head to Culture Collectives on State Street and support these small local businesses. To learn more, visit: https://www.cityofmadison.com/news/culture-collectives-madison-pop-up-shops-are-now-open-on-state-street.

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The Bad Seed Brings Tex-Mex Flavors and Eclectic Ambience to Historic Building in Hillyard | Food News | Spokane | Interior of the Pacific Northwest https://cacaovm.org/the-bad-seed-brings-tex-mex-flavors-and-eclectic-ambience-to-historic-building-in-hillyard-food-news-spokane-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/the-bad-seed-brings-tex-mex-flavors-and-eclectic-ambience-to-historic-building-in-hillyard-food-news-spokane-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Click to enlarge Photo of young Kwak Shrimp and smoked pork on cheese masa porridge. Spokane’s historic Hillyard is fast becoming one of the region’s top foodie destinations. The new Bad Seed restaurant and bar contributes to this appellation. Located inside a historic Italian Renaissance-style brick building that served as a branch of the Hillyard […]]]>

Click to enlarge

Photo of young Kwak

Shrimp and smoked pork on cheese masa porridge.

Spokane’s historic Hillyard is fast becoming one of the region’s top foodie destinations.

The new Bad Seed restaurant and bar contributes to this appellation. Located inside a historic Italian Renaissance-style brick building that served as a branch of the Hillyard Public Library for over 50 years, the Bad Seed attracts visitors with an ornate Gothic-style facade.

Once inside, they’ll find Tex-Mex style food, creative handcrafted cocktails, and a moody vibe. Under the beautifully carved beamed ceilings of the open ceiling, solid wood tables reminiscent of grandma’s kitchen are juxtaposed with some huge paintings of female nude hanging in the 21+ bar. Stacks of old books bound in fabric and the warm glow of shaded lamps, meanwhile, evoke a warm and studious atmosphere in a nod to the past life of the building.

“We’re not the Bad Seed like in ‘Rough and Tumble’, it’s like a fancy Bad Seed, but a laid back fancy,” says owner JJ Wandler. “The name doesn’t reduce us to one thing, and our menu has evolved – even in the first five to six weeks of opening – although I don’t think we’ll leave Tex-Mex behind. But the Bad Seed lends itself to anything. ”

Wandler is not a newcomer to the restaurant business; he opened the old Garageland bar and restaurant in downtown Spokane and co-owns a hip French-inspired place called Gainsbourg in North Seattle.

In March, when he started planning Bad Seed, Wandler thought that by the time it opened, the most restrictive pandemic setbacks of the past two years would have passed. Overall, that’s true (although labor shortages and supply chain issues continue to plague the hospitality industry). However, thanks to the unintentional opening of Kismet, another new restaurant nearby, on the same day in mid-September, along with a quick word on food and drink offerings worthy of both, the Bad Seed has been much more busy getting started than he had expected.

This resulted in growing difficulties due to the restaurant’s small fully electric kitchen. And the Bad Seed opener, recruited by Wandler to develop his menu, resigned after a Friday night shift several weeks ago. This put then-chef Josh Grimes – whose past stints include Ruins, Lucky You Lounge, Casper Fry, and Mizuna – in charge. Recently, Wandler and Grimes streamlined the food menu to help cut wait times.

“We all really want Hillyard to be successful as a foodie destination, and there are a few other places in the late planning stages as well,” Wandler said. (These projects are Industry, a bar and a second location for Bellwether Brewing Co.)

“I’m super excited with everything that’s going on, and of course Red Dragon has been here for a long time and they’re like the grandpa of bringing people to Hillyard to eat,” he continues. “I used to come here to eat at Red Dragon long before I thought of opening a restaurant.”

Click to enlarge Bad Seed Owner JJ Wandler - YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Photo of young Kwak

Bad Seed Owner JJ Wandler

TBad Seed’s menu is a Tex-Mex classic, and was designed in part to feature several house sauces with complex flavors, like the tomato-based ranchero on his huevos rancheros ($ 12), chipotle juice with bolillo torta ($ 14, stuffed with brisket, carnitas seasoned pork or tofu) and the spicier roja sauce dipped on enchiladas ($ 14).

For appetizers, choose between a homemade salsa with tostadas ($ 5) or a queso ($ 8) made with Oaxacan cheese from LakeWolf Creamery in Deer Park. There’s also elote ($ 7) and a few salads ($ 7 to $ 9), but the appetizer section that stands out is the Tejas pork, which consists of a thinly sliced ​​smoked beef tenderloin with a trio of accessories: homemade macha (chili oil), chimichurri and spicy sesame and roasted seeds.

For those who like their Tex-Mex to add a little extra heat, Bad Seed offers two custom hot sauces from California-based Infinity Sauces. The titular Bad Seed is made from habañero, while the High Plains Drifter is made from jalapeño and more tomato.

Don’t skip dessert: the flourless chocolate pie ($ 8) with berry compote is decadent. There is also a cheesecake ($ 8) topped with dulce de leche.

At the bar, Wandler made sure to offer a few Mexican and Texan beers, including Modelo Especial and Shiner Bock on tap. Topo Chico and Jarritos are on the alcohol-free list, while the cocktail list includes a house margarita ($ 8) and up, like “Fear and Loathing” ($ 8), a shot of fine bourbon, and a large can of. PBR. An unusual choice is “Death in the Afternoon” ($ 11), a concoction of absinthe and sparkling wine.

Although the bar side of Bad Seed is larger, the restaurant offers seating for all ages, as well as a children’s menu. Live jazz nights are scheduled for the first Monday of each month, and happy hour at the bar is daily from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Currently, the Bad Seed is only open for dinner, although Wandler plans to extend the hours to next spring when the venue’s back patio opens.

Wandler is excited to be involved in the ongoing revival of Hillyard and its Market Street business district. His immigrant great-grandparents and grandparents once lived in the area, and he is passionate about historic preservation – both Hillyard’s built environment and its working-class culture.

“It’s a bit of the last underutilized neighborhood [in Spokane] with [commercial] vacancies, ”he said. “That’s what I was thinking when I did this – where is Hillyard going?” – and I like the direction it’s going. And by sitting down with other business people, we all look to the future of Hillyard. “♦ ♦

The Bad Seed • 2936 E. Olympic Ave. • Open Tuesday to Saturday from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. • facebook.com/badseedinhillyard • 509-822-7439

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Sweet dreams – the hopes of cocoa fruit snack companies https://cacaovm.org/sweet-dreams-the-hopes-of-cocoa-fruit-snack-companies/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 12:11:29 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/sweet-dreams-the-hopes-of-cocoa-fruit-snack-companies/ Cocoa fruit is emerging as a newcomer, with some major players in the confectionery industry believing in its potential as an ingredient beyond being the global source of cocoa. Products are slowly appearing on the market, and research suggests there is more to come. The cocoa fruit has been used to produce cocoa from its […]]]>

Cocoa fruit is emerging as a newcomer, with some major players in the confectionery industry believing in its potential as an ingredient beyond being the global source of cocoa. Products are slowly appearing on the market, and research suggests there is more to come.

The cocoa fruit has been used to produce cocoa from its beans for chocolate and baking applications. But its other potential attributes have long been ignored in the Western world until very recently.

The hard-shelled fruit comes from the Theobroma cocoa tree which is said to have its origins in Brazil, Colombia and Peru, but is now widely cultivated in other countries of South America, as well as in Africa and Asia, where it is also known for its sweet and tangy taste. juice.

Its beans or seeds have traditionally been extracted, fermented, and ground into cocoa, while the outer shell, or skin, and the white, fleshy nutritional pulp surrounding the beans, has been discarded. However, over the past two years, product developers have discovered that these other components of the cocoa fruit, including juice, can be used in confectionery and snacks. And with potential applications in ice cream, beverages and dairy products as well.

The first products to hit the market

Proponents say that the juice and pulp can replace sugar in foods and drinks, while the cocoa fruit also contains antioxidants, thiamine, vitamin B6, and magnesium. It is a source of theobromine, an alkaloid believed to lower blood pressure and reduce inflammation and bad cholesterol. And the husk can be ground into flour as an alternative ingredient to other fillers.

The fruit could call for increased interest in recycling and reducing food waste, while cocoa fruit farmers could reap a better living wage by earning more from the crop they produce.

Nestlé, Mondelez International and Barry Callebaut, alongside its subsidiary Cabosse Naturals, have been working for the past two years on products – mostly chocolate – using various parts of the fruit, either for a unique fruity citrus flavor, or for natural softness.

Nestlé first tried it with a KitKat in Japan in 2019 – KitKat Cacao Fruit Chocolate, a 70% dark chocolate produced from the beans and sweetened with the pulp. The world’s largest agri-food company then followed it up this year with Incoa, a 70% dark chocolate bar under the Les Recettes de L’Atelier brand. The product was initially launched in the Netherlands and France, and again used the pulp with no refined sugar added.

Louise Barrett, director of Nestlé’s Technology Center in York, UK, which handles global confectionery R&D, said the thought process began two years before the launch of KitKat, while Nestlé was examining whether the other parts of the cocoa fruit could be used in chocolate. “Now it’s gaining momentum because it’s a great product in its own right,” she says.

“Likewise, I think it contains some great elements of sustainability if you think about how material is wasted today. I think that’s where it gained interest and traction as well, but above all it’s a really interesting and delicious ingredient.

“We took out all the sucrose we typically used in dark chocolate and replaced it with this cocoa pulp to naturally soften it. We still want to explore how we use it, but we have been working on developing a process for marketing. The supply chain for these kinds of ingredients didn’t exist at all two and a half years ago, so it’s been quite a technical development to get us to this point.

Multiple factors at play

Mondelez, in partnership with Barry Callebaut, was also present in 2019 with CaPao Cacaofruit Bites, snacks incorporating beans, skin, pulp and juice, with the addition of nuts, seeds, spices and ‘herbs.

Shannon Neumann, Director of Innovation at SnackFutures, Mondelez’s innovation and venture capital hub behind the CaPao brand, explains the company’s interest: as well as societal.

“Our supply chain contains this fantastic fruit that we have used for centuries to make chocolate, but it only represents 30% of the whole fruit; 70% of these fruits are wasted. The idea becomes: how can we better use these resources both to help prevent food waste and to provide farmers with more income for their crops? ”

Neumann says the pulp has a tangy and tangy flavor, much like a combination of exotic lychee and mango fruit and honey. It has a “mild tropical taste” while the husk is “relatively neutral but with an earthy and nutty taste”, which makes it ideal when ground as a flour substitute.

Barry Callebaut, the world’s largest supplier of cocoa and chocolate products, launched last June with its WholeFruit Chocolate bar under the Cacao Barry brand. Launched in collaboration with Cabosse, WholeFruit is a 100% “pure cocoa” dark chocolate serving chefs and artisans, initially in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, the United States, Canada, Japan and Brazil.

Sylvie Woltering-Valat, Marketing Manager at Cabosse, declares: “Millennials and centennials have turned to products that are not only tasty but also nutritious, and which leave a positive impact on the planet.

“It can be used as a replacement for refined sugars, but – where we think there is much more exciting news – we are bringing real new flavor to the market. It lends itself very well to applications like ice cream, drinks and snacks.

“With WholeFruit, we made chocolate from 100% pure cocoa fruit and sweetened the chocolate with the pulp. The approach was not to replace the sugar, but to really magnify the taste of the fruit in the chocolate.

Woltering-Valat explains the potential. “We are building a new category of chocolate that meets the health and wellness needs of consumers, because it is unique in terms of taste, nutritious and good for the planet, as we now recycle the pulp and the outer layer. of the fruit.

“As with every new breakthrough, it takes time to establish. Certainly, you have to build awareness, you have to familiarize people with it, experience it and then convert it to the next level.

Convince consumers

Ultimately, however, it’s all about taste and built-in preferences. Publicizing a product like cocoa fruit, with its unique flavors and environmental qualities, is one thing, but it’s another game to convince consumers accustomed to their favorite chocolate, for example.

“The only challenge we are going to have in the commoditization of these products is to know [the cacao fruit] is replacing. Sugar is super abundant and super cheap, ”Steve Osborn, director of Aurora Ceres Partnership, a UK-based food and drink consultancy, told Just Food.

“We can sit here and say idealistically ‘this is great, we get the sweetness of the natural pulp of the cocoa fruit, we use all the waste.’ This is very good and we should welcome this kind of philosophical change. The other part, of course, is that we are very attentive to our taste profiles.

Mondelez, Barry Callebaut and Cabosse recognize that their new products are at premium prices.

Woltering-Valat de Cabosse says: “Our ability to crack this fruit is really our ability to produce large quantities with very high quality products that preserve nutrition and delicious flavors. This obviously comes at a cost, and we are indeed looking for more premium types of pricing. ”

Price is an issue to be overcome if chocolate confectionery, snacks and other emerging products made from the cocoa fruit are to appeal to the mass market.

“You have to enter this core market,” says Osborn. “Otherwise, it ends up being a premium niche. And although a premium niche has its place, there is always a ripple effect [needed]; how to get consumers to change their taste profile.

“I am always fascinated to hear about these products. I think that’s the right direction and it’s the right philosophy, but it’s about how we go against this huge trading machine. And that is not easy.

The need for scale

Nestlé’s Barrett says greater scale is needed to reduce costs, especially when taking a fresh raw material that is 80% water and then drying it and converting it into a variety of different products. “It’s about understanding how we can make it a more commercial supply chain and ingredient,” she says.

However, while Neumann admits that Mondelez’s CaPao Cacaofruit Bites belong to the high-end segment, she says that “in the confectionery world, it depends on how you optimize your formula; you might add that ingredient, but there might be another area where you might be able to take some costs out to keep it neutral for the consumer ”.

Nonetheless, from a farmers’ point of view, the developments could make a difference. They could potentially earn more with the same number of trees, which previously only generated income from beans used to produce cocoa, with, coming back to Neumann’s point, 70% of the fruit being wasted.

Woltering-Valat develops the theme. “We make better use of these resources, but also better use all the efforts they have made to grow the fruits, in energy, in water, in the time they have invested.”

Neumann says the potential for using previously discarded fruit parts matches the growing awareness of recycling and food waste on the part of manufacturers and consumers alike.

In the United States, for example, the nonprofit Upcycled Food Association was founded in 2019, formed in its own words by “the recycled food companies themselves, who have recognized the power of collaboration to develop a successful food category and environmental movement ”.

Mondelez’s SnackFutures is part of this association which, in April, launched a product label that would be the world’s first certification mark for recycled food.

At Nestlé, Barrett says an 80% dark chocolate Incoa variety is on the way, declining to provide further details, while Neumann says CaPao Cacaofruit Bites will be joined in October. by a “new format that we” are pretty much ready to talk about, but not quite yet “.

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The growing culture of Indian handmade chocolates https://cacaovm.org/the-growing-culture-of-indian-handmade-chocolates/ Tue, 06 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/the-growing-culture-of-indian-handmade-chocolates/ For all joyous occasions, our signature and our easiest way to celebrate it would be with chocolates; Sad and in need of a mood enhancer? Take a chocolate bar! The heavenly smell and taste of chocolates has been sweet nectar for all of us. And for the chocolate industry in India, there has been no […]]]>

For all joyous occasions, our signature and our easiest way to celebrate it would be with chocolates; Sad and in need of a mood enhancer? Take a chocolate bar! The heavenly smell and taste of chocolates has been sweet nectar for all of us. And for the chocolate industry in India, there has been no sweeter time than this – a burgeoning chocolate movement is blooming across the country. “The growth of chocolate in India is increasing rapidly. Many factors have led to this change. The most important factor is that people choose chocolates over traditional Indian candies to offer them at festivals and occasions, ”says Ishan Pansuria, founder and curator of Toska Chocolates, a brand of bean bar chocolate.

The Indian chocolate movement may have found its place today, but it has been the efforts of many years to help farmers get a better price for their products, to satisfy the consumer’s sweet tooth in a way. healthier and years after now, we are able to where the designers of these artisanal chocolate bars are appreciated from afar. As more and more chocolatiers, artisan chocolate brands are emerging in the country, how are these chocolates different?

The magic of flavors:

Perhaps you have seen these chocolates make their first appearance in cafes, organic food shopping malls before popping up in your nearest online stores. These chocolates contain a high percentage of cocoa and usually come in funky packaging that immediately catches your eye. Devansh Ashar, Founder of Pascati, the USDA’s first organic and fair trade chocolate brand in India, explains, “The Indian consumer’s willingness to experiment along with the growth in disposable and dual income makes the urban Indian want to try. unique products with their eclectic flavors. The Indian palate now enjoys trying the tastes and flavor combinations of the world. “

If you were to list a regular dark chocolate flavor, it would usually be the regulars including cranberries, fruit, and nuts. Now, exotic flavors like masala chai, Hawaiian hibiscus in these new chocolates immediately intrigue you. Developing flavors is both an art and a craft. To this, Mr. Nitin L Chordia, India’s first chocolate maker and founder of the world’s first zero waste chocolate – Kocoatrait adds: These new flavors are a testament to the fact that the preferences of Indian chocolate consumers are changing. This creates an opportunity for chocolate makers from the bean to the bar to extend their range beyond the obvious. In addition, the smaller scale production batches allow chocolate bar beans to create and launch with agility and more easily compared to mass market chocolatiers. “

Kocoatrait’s best-selling flavors include jasmine, red rose, more milagai while Pascati’s bestseller includes raspberry hibiscus, blueberry nut, paan, among others. All of these beloved flavors include a blend of basic natives and an acquired enhanced taste that one would like to have a clue in their daily life. The shelves of the market are popularized with artisanal Indian chocolates.

As this new culture and interest explode, these small, local brands are spearheading the evolution towards fine chocolate. The growing number of artisanal chocolates in the country has created a unique new way for Indians to consume these delicacies. Of course, giant brands like Cadbury, Ferrero Rocher continue to play their part, but the newly designed chocolates play a part in exploring a new chocolate economy. Nitin assures: “The market, of course, has evolved and more openly welcomes specialty products (such as coffee, chocolates, etc.). However, it is clear that it is not profitable for established giants like Cadbury’s etc. to focus on this small segment and it is not cost effective for bean bar chocolate manufacturers to focus on this segment and consumers. “

The concept of “Bean To Bar” chocolate:

As Gen Z I grew up with Cadbury, Amul chocolates and perhaps no one in India was ever introduced to the concept of bean to bar chocolates. Indian artisan chocolates were not present at that time. Slowly in the late 2010s, the concept of ‘bean to bar’ chocolates emerged with many brands making their own chocolate bars with sustainability as a major trait. These brands are now growing at an unprecedented rate.

Explaining their difference from regular chocolates, Devansh says, “Many of the commercially available chocolates are mass-produced from semi-finished (store-bought) chocolate to finished products. Some are even compounds (contain palm oil / hydrogenated vegetable fats, little to no cocoa butter content, more sugar than cocoa). In addition, to maintain the taste of chocolate, each brand available commercially alkalizes its cocoa to pickle it.

A bean to bar brand of chocolate changes that very notion. He adds: “Bean to Bar chocolate literally means chocolate processed from bean to bar, that is, from the raw product to the finished product, made in small batches. Not all chocolates are bean to bar. bar.” Mr. Nitin says many brands don’t start processing cocoa beans. They just buy loose chocolate and melt it in molds to make a chocolate bar. These are called chocolatiers and should be distinguished from the “Bean to Bar” chocolatiers who themselves control the whole process.

Improving the quality of chocolate has helped to refine consumers’ palates. Since time immemorial this dark chocolate has been seen as good for the heart and we have switched to this type of chocolate, giving birth to more dark chocolate, vegan, organic and sugar free variants. Recalling a similar inspiration for launching Toska chocolates, Ishan shares, “I have always been a fan of dark chocolates since I was a child. My dad traveled abroad a lot and always bought me these amazing dark chocolates. used to look for such quality in Indian markets, I did not find it. There is a myth in India that “dark chocolates taste bitter.” But in reality only bad dark chocolates that are made with bad cocoa beans taste bitter. I always had this idea in mind to start my own chocolate business to make good quality dark chocolates. “

Yes, you can blame the quality of the cocoa beans which made the chocolates feel compromised and not made to standards. Mr. Nitin remarks: “Most of the impressions are from those early days in the industry. However, a lot has changed since then. The genetic variety of cocoa available in India can still be limiting and prevents chocolate makers from reach the required level.balance between delicate aromatic notes, astringency, acidity and bitterness. We are now able to control both the post-harvest to obtain a more balanced cocoa and to control a lot at the stage of chocolate processing. Chocolates made with carefully selected cocoa beans give a satisfying taste to satisfy the improved palate of the customer. Many good quality chocolate brands have now entered the market and people who appreciate these chocolates have entered the market. ask again.

The constant flow of artisan chocolate brands:

The consistent taste of these mass-produced chocolates has been our choice, but has now led to saturation point for the Indian consumer. But like any other growing business, these high-quality, production-order chocolates come with their own set of challenges. Devansh says, “The supply chain for quality cocoa is poor in India. One of the main reasons for this is the very low level of education on fermentation and drying at the farm level.

For most artisans, the biggest challenges were logistics and even the weather. Logistics in a tropical country does not make transporting chocolate easy. Indian weather has been synonymous with creating transport problems and the pandemic has added to it. “The skyrocketing logistics costs after COVID have been of concern,” Devansh adds. However, Nitin seems to have found a silver lining in the increasing challenges, “To meet the weather challenges during production, we simply recreated a European environment with temperature and humidity control in our finishing room. Regarding logistics, we used single-use plastic-free insulated packaging and learned how to use the most efficient route to have chocolates regularly delivered overnight to consumers in major cities. ”

Image credits: Chocolat Pascati

While there are some customers who like to indulge in bites of this artisanal chocolate, the precise and high-quality methods can eventually lead to these chocolates being more expensive than a regular chocolate bar. “The biggest challenge has been the chocolate’s MRP which is 8-10 times higher than a trademark and sometimes customers don’t understand the difference and don’t appreciate the craft.” Ishan shares. None of the craftsmen can, of course, claim to compete with the brands already in place and they do not even see them as competitors. There is not much overlap between their consumers and the “bean to bar” consumers.

These are signature chocolates that are specially crafted to an enhanced individual’s taste. This is where these artisanal chocolate products come in and take advantage of their own base. It is a joyful chocolate bar that your parents will not blame you for having indulged in it, also thanks to its nutritional values.

(Also read: 4 classic chef-approved Eid desserts to savor this holiday season)

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