Cacao fruit – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 07:53:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cacaovm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-150x150.png Cacao fruit – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ 32 32 Belgian chocolatier uses Barry Callebaut’s Cabosse recycled cocoa fruit in its chocolate fillings https://cacaovm.org/belgian-chocolatier-uses-barry-callebauts-cabosse-recycled-cocoa-fruit-in-its-chocolate-fillings/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/belgian-chocolatier-uses-barry-callebauts-cabosse-recycled-cocoa-fruit-in-its-chocolate-fillings/ February 02, 2022 — Belgian chocolatier Confiserie Vandenbulcke is among the first to use recycled cocoa fruit pulp from Barry Callebaut as a filling for its dark chocolates. Cabosse is made from the white pulp surrounding the cocoa bean which is normally discarded. On the showfloor of ISM & ProSweets 2022 in […]]]>




February 02, 2022 — Belgian chocolatier Confiserie Vandenbulcke is among the first to use recycled cocoa fruit pulp from Barry Callebaut as a filling for its dark chocolates. Cabosse is made from the white pulp surrounding the cocoa bean which is normally discarded.

On the showfloor of ISM & ProSweets 2022 in Cologne, Germany, Nicolas Degryse, Head of Chocolate Marketing at Vandenbulcke Confiserie, talks to FoodIngredientsFirst on how the ingredient is enjoying adoption in mainstream chocolate houses.

“In traditional chocolate, only cocoa beans are used. But cocoa beans are only 30% of the cocoa fruit. The remaining 70% is made up of the juicy white pulp and thick skin that surrounds the beans,” notes Degryse.

“Normally, these pieces of fruit are thrown away. We have created the filling of our chocolate with this white flesh, which recycles a product normally thrown in the trash.

“What is typical of the cocoa fruit is that it is very pungent. It’s a little bittersweet, so it’s an atypical taste for chocolate. Normally, chocolate has sweet fillings, but here we are experimenting with a sweet and sour filling.

Use of whole fruit
Traditionally, this white cocoa fruit pulp is left on the beans to aid in the fermentation process – a crucial step in chocolate making. As the pulp breaks down around the kernels, it helps supply yeasts, bacteria, and enzymes.

The Cabosse concept is considered to be farmer-friendly as farmers take home increased income as they can sell more cocoa fruits.However, only a small percentage of the pulp is needed for this process, with much of it being wasted. The underutilized potential of this ingredient is at odds with today’s sustainability-conscious consumers.

The Upcycled Food Association calculates that if all cocoa fruit harvested were used to the maximum, it would reduce the same amount of CO2 as planting 3.5 billion trees per year – which is an area larger than France. and Germany together.

Farmer-friendly and eco-friendly
The word “Cabosse” comes from the French word for the cocoa pod used in plantations in West Africa along the equator.

The Cabosse concept is considered to be farmer-friendly as farmers take home increased income as they can sell more cocoa fruits.

Thanks to Cabosse Naturals’ collaboration with cocoa farming communities in Ecuador, the time between harvesting and processing fresh cocoa fruit into ingredients has been reduced to a maximum of five hours.

“At the moment, our chocolates at Confiserie Vandenbulcke using Cabosse are still in development. The chocolates we have at ISM & ProSweets 2022 are the only samples we have at the moment, so they are not yet available on the market,” says Degryse.

“We started in October with the development of the chocolate, its packaging as well as its brand storytelling.”

Degryse adds that Confiserie Vandenbulcke favors ecological packaging for its recycled product. “We also use ecological packaging which replaces the plastic tray with a tray made of recycled paper”, specifies Degryse.

Over the past year, other cocoa fruit chocolate iterations have hit the shelves. For example, Nestlé offers the Incoa bar, which is a 70% dark chocolate bar made exclusively with the fruit of the cocoa under the Les Recettes de L’Atelier brand.

In Japan, Nestlé unveiled a KitKat using dried cocoa powder pulp as a substitute for traditional sugar.

Barry Callebaut first unveiled the “first expression” of its WholeFruit line of chocolates, made from 100% pure cocoa fruit, last June. The product obtained has a natural acidity and fruity notes reminiscent of exotic fruits.

By Benjamin Ferrer with additional reporting by Missy Green at ISM & ProSweets 2022

To contact our editorial team, please email us at Editorial@cnsmedia.com

If you found this article useful, you may wish to receive our newsletters.
Subscribe now to get the latest news straight to your inbox.

]]>
Sweet dreams – the hopes of cocoa fruit snack companies https://cacaovm.org/sweet-dreams-the-hopes-of-cocoa-fruit-snack-companies/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 12:11:29 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/sweet-dreams-the-hopes-of-cocoa-fruit-snack-companies/ Cocoa fruit is emerging as a newcomer, with some major players in the confectionery industry believing in its potential as an ingredient beyond being the global source of cocoa. Products are slowly appearing on the market, and research suggests there is more to come. The cocoa fruit has been used to produce cocoa from its […]]]>

Cocoa fruit is emerging as a newcomer, with some major players in the confectionery industry believing in its potential as an ingredient beyond being the global source of cocoa. Products are slowly appearing on the market, and research suggests there is more to come.

The cocoa fruit has been used to produce cocoa from its beans for chocolate and baking applications. But its other potential attributes have long been ignored in the Western world until very recently.

The hard-shelled fruit comes from the Theobroma cocoa tree which is said to have its origins in Brazil, Colombia and Peru, but is now widely cultivated in other countries of South America, as well as in Africa and Asia, where it is also known for its sweet and tangy taste. juice.

Its beans or seeds have traditionally been extracted, fermented, and ground into cocoa, while the outer shell, or skin, and the white, fleshy nutritional pulp surrounding the beans, has been discarded. However, over the past two years, product developers have discovered that these other components of the cocoa fruit, including juice, can be used in confectionery and snacks. And with potential applications in ice cream, beverages and dairy products as well.

The first products to hit the market

Proponents say that the juice and pulp can replace sugar in foods and drinks, while the cocoa fruit also contains antioxidants, thiamine, vitamin B6, and magnesium. It is a source of theobromine, an alkaloid believed to lower blood pressure and reduce inflammation and bad cholesterol. And the husk can be ground into flour as an alternative ingredient to other fillers.

The fruit could call for increased interest in recycling and reducing food waste, while cocoa fruit farmers could reap a better living wage by earning more from the crop they produce.

Nestlé, Mondelez International and Barry Callebaut, alongside its subsidiary Cabosse Naturals, have been working for the past two years on products – mostly chocolate – using various parts of the fruit, either for a unique fruity citrus flavor, or for natural softness.

Nestlé first tried it with a KitKat in Japan in 2019 – KitKat Cacao Fruit Chocolate, a 70% dark chocolate produced from the beans and sweetened with the pulp. The world’s largest agri-food company then followed it up this year with Incoa, a 70% dark chocolate bar under the Les Recettes de L’Atelier brand. The product was initially launched in the Netherlands and France, and again used the pulp with no refined sugar added.

Louise Barrett, director of Nestlé’s Technology Center in York, UK, which handles global confectionery R&D, said the thought process began two years before the launch of KitKat, while Nestlé was examining whether the other parts of the cocoa fruit could be used in chocolate. “Now it’s gaining momentum because it’s a great product in its own right,” she says.

“Likewise, I think it contains some great elements of sustainability if you think about how material is wasted today. I think that’s where it gained interest and traction as well, but above all it’s a really interesting and delicious ingredient.

“We took out all the sucrose we typically used in dark chocolate and replaced it with this cocoa pulp to naturally soften it. We still want to explore how we use it, but we have been working on developing a process for marketing. The supply chain for these kinds of ingredients didn’t exist at all two and a half years ago, so it’s been quite a technical development to get us to this point.

Multiple factors at play

Mondelez, in partnership with Barry Callebaut, was also present in 2019 with CaPao Cacaofruit Bites, snacks incorporating beans, skin, pulp and juice, with the addition of nuts, seeds, spices and ‘herbs.

Shannon Neumann, Director of Innovation at SnackFutures, Mondelez’s innovation and venture capital hub behind the CaPao brand, explains the company’s interest: as well as societal.

“Our supply chain contains this fantastic fruit that we have used for centuries to make chocolate, but it only represents 30% of the whole fruit; 70% of these fruits are wasted. The idea becomes: how can we better use these resources both to help prevent food waste and to provide farmers with more income for their crops? ”

Neumann says the pulp has a tangy and tangy flavor, much like a combination of exotic lychee and mango fruit and honey. It has a “mild tropical taste” while the husk is “relatively neutral but with an earthy and nutty taste”, which makes it ideal when ground as a flour substitute.

Barry Callebaut, the world’s largest supplier of cocoa and chocolate products, launched last June with its WholeFruit Chocolate bar under the Cacao Barry brand. Launched in collaboration with Cabosse, WholeFruit is a 100% “pure cocoa” dark chocolate serving chefs and artisans, initially in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, the United States, Canada, Japan and Brazil.

Sylvie Woltering-Valat, Marketing Manager at Cabosse, declares: “Millennials and centennials have turned to products that are not only tasty but also nutritious, and which leave a positive impact on the planet.

“It can be used as a replacement for refined sugars, but – where we think there is much more exciting news – we are bringing real new flavor to the market. It lends itself very well to applications like ice cream, drinks and snacks.

“With WholeFruit, we made chocolate from 100% pure cocoa fruit and sweetened the chocolate with the pulp. The approach was not to replace the sugar, but to really magnify the taste of the fruit in the chocolate.

Woltering-Valat explains the potential. “We are building a new category of chocolate that meets the health and wellness needs of consumers, because it is unique in terms of taste, nutritious and good for the planet, as we now recycle the pulp and the outer layer. of the fruit.

“As with every new breakthrough, it takes time to establish. Certainly, you have to build awareness, you have to familiarize people with it, experience it and then convert it to the next level.

Convince consumers

Ultimately, however, it’s all about taste and built-in preferences. Publicizing a product like cocoa fruit, with its unique flavors and environmental qualities, is one thing, but it’s another game to convince consumers accustomed to their favorite chocolate, for example.

“The only challenge we are going to have in the commoditization of these products is to know [the cacao fruit] is replacing. Sugar is super abundant and super cheap, ”Steve Osborn, director of Aurora Ceres Partnership, a UK-based food and drink consultancy, told Just Food.

“We can sit here and say idealistically ‘this is great, we get the sweetness of the natural pulp of the cocoa fruit, we use all the waste.’ This is very good and we should welcome this kind of philosophical change. The other part, of course, is that we are very attentive to our taste profiles.

Mondelez, Barry Callebaut and Cabosse recognize that their new products are at premium prices.

Woltering-Valat de Cabosse says: “Our ability to crack this fruit is really our ability to produce large quantities with very high quality products that preserve nutrition and delicious flavors. This obviously comes at a cost, and we are indeed looking for more premium types of pricing. ”

Price is an issue to be overcome if chocolate confectionery, snacks and other emerging products made from the cocoa fruit are to appeal to the mass market.

“You have to enter this core market,” says Osborn. “Otherwise, it ends up being a premium niche. And although a premium niche has its place, there is always a ripple effect [needed]; how to get consumers to change their taste profile.

“I am always fascinated to hear about these products. I think that’s the right direction and it’s the right philosophy, but it’s about how we go against this huge trading machine. And that is not easy.

The need for scale

Nestlé’s Barrett says greater scale is needed to reduce costs, especially when taking a fresh raw material that is 80% water and then drying it and converting it into a variety of different products. “It’s about understanding how we can make it a more commercial supply chain and ingredient,” she says.

However, while Neumann admits that Mondelez’s CaPao Cacaofruit Bites belong to the high-end segment, she says that “in the confectionery world, it depends on how you optimize your formula; you might add that ingredient, but there might be another area where you might be able to take some costs out to keep it neutral for the consumer ”.

Nonetheless, from a farmers’ point of view, the developments could make a difference. They could potentially earn more with the same number of trees, which previously only generated income from beans used to produce cocoa, with, coming back to Neumann’s point, 70% of the fruit being wasted.

Woltering-Valat develops the theme. “We make better use of these resources, but also better use all the efforts they have made to grow the fruits, in energy, in water, in the time they have invested.”

Neumann says the potential for using previously discarded fruit parts matches the growing awareness of recycling and food waste on the part of manufacturers and consumers alike.

In the United States, for example, the nonprofit Upcycled Food Association was founded in 2019, formed in its own words by “the recycled food companies themselves, who have recognized the power of collaboration to develop a successful food category and environmental movement ”.

Mondelez’s SnackFutures is part of this association which, in April, launched a product label that would be the world’s first certification mark for recycled food.

At Nestlé, Barrett says an 80% dark chocolate Incoa variety is on the way, declining to provide further details, while Neumann says CaPao Cacaofruit Bites will be joined in October. by a “new format that we” are pretty much ready to talk about, but not quite yet “.

]]>
Sweet dreams – snack makers’ hopes for cocoa fruit https://cacaovm.org/sweet-dreams-snack-makers-hopes-for-cocoa-fruit/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/sweet-dreams-snack-makers-hopes-for-cocoa-fruit/ Nestlé L’Atelier Chocolate Recipes with Cocoa Fruits from Incoa The cocoa fruit is becoming a new kid on the block, with some major players in the confectionery industry believing in its potential as an ingredient beyond being the world’s source of cocoa. Products are slowly appearing on the market and research suggests there are more […]]]>

The cocoa fruit is becoming a new kid on the block, with some major players in the confectionery industry believing in its potential as an ingredient beyond being the world’s source of cocoa. Products are slowly appearing on the market and research suggests there are more to come.

The cocoa fruit has been used to produce cocoa from its beans for chocolate and bakery applications. But its other potential attributes have long been overlooked in the Western world until very recently.

The hard-shelled fruit comes from the Theobroma cacao tree which is believed to have originated in Brazil, Colombia and Peru, but is now widely grown in other South American countries, as well as Africa and Asia, where it is also known for its sweet and pungent taste. juice.

Its beans or seeds have traditionally been extracted, fermented and ground into cocoa, while the outer husk or skin and the chewy white nutritional pulp surrounding the beans have been discarded. However, over the past two years, product developers have discovered that these other cocoa fruit components, including the juice, can be used in confections and snacks. And with potential applications in ice cream, beverages and dairy as well.

The first products hit the market

Proponents say the juice and pulp can replace sugar in foods and drinks, while the cocoa fruit also contains antioxidants, thiamin, vitamin B6 and magnesium. It is a source of theobromine, an alkaloid believed to lower blood pressure and reduce inflammation and bad cholesterol. And the casing can be ground into flour as an alternative ingredient to other fillers.

The fruit could appeal to the increased interest in recycling and reducing food waste, while cocoa fruit farmers could earn a better living wage by earning more from the crop they produce.

Nestlé, Mondelez International and Barry Callebaut, alongside its subsidiary Cabosse Naturals, have been working on products over the past two years – primarily chocolate – using various parts of the fruit, either for a unique citrus fruity flavor or for natural sweetness.

Nestlé first tried it with a KitKat in Japan in 2019 – KitKat Cacao Fruit Chocolate, a 70% dark chocolate produced from the beans and sweetened with the pulp. The world’s largest food company then followed suit this year with Incoa, a 70% dark chocolate bar under the Les Recettes de L’Atelier brand. The product was originally launched in the Netherlands and France, and again used the paste with no added refined sugar.

Louise Barrett, head of Nestlé’s technology center in the UK city of York, which handles global confectionery R&D, says the thought process began two years before the launch of KitKat as Nestlé explored whether the other parts of the cocoa fruit could be used in chocolate. “Now it’s gaining momentum because it’s a great product in its own right,” she says.

“Also, I think there are great elements of sustainability if you think about how today what’s wasted as a material. I think that’s where it’s also gained in interest and popularity, but above all it is a really interesting and tasty ingredient.

“We took out all the sucrose that we would typically use in a dark chocolate and replaced it with this cocoa pulp to naturally sweeten it. We still want to explore other ways to use it, but we’ve been working on developing a commercialization process. The supply chain for this type of ingredient didn’t exist at all two and a half years ago, so it’s been quite a technical development to get us to this point.

Several factors at play

Mondelez, in partnership with Barry Callebaut, was also on board in 2019 with CaPao Cacaofruit Bites, snacks incorporating beans, rinds, pulp and juice, with the addition of nuts, seeds, spices and spices. herbs.

Shannon Neumann, chief innovation officer at SnackFutures, the Mondelez innovation and venture capital center behind the CaPao brand, explains the company’s interest: “We know that 30% of all The world’s food is wasted, and the resulting challenges are environmental, as well as societal.

“Our supply chain contains this fantastic fruit that we have used for centuries to make chocolate, but it is only 30% of the whole fruit; 70% of this fruit is wasted. The idea becomes: how can we better use these resources both to help prevent food waste and to provide farmers with more income for their crops? »

Neumann says the pulp has a pungent, pungent flavor, much like a combination between the exotic fruits lychee and mango, and honey. It has a “sweet tropical taste”, while the husk is “relatively neutral but with an earthy and nutty taste”, making it ideal when ground as a flour substitute.

Barry Callebaut, the world’s largest supplier of cocoa and chocolate products, went it alone in June this year with its WholeFruit Chocolate bar under the Cacao Barry brand. Launched in collaboration with Cabosse, WholeFruit is a 100% “pure cocoa” dark chocolate serving chefs and artisans, initially in the UK, France, Italy, USA, Canada, Japan and Brazil.

Sylvie Woltering-Valat, marketing manager at Cabosse, says: “Millennials and centenarians have turned to products that are not only tasty but also nutritious, and which have a positive impact on the planet.

“It can be used as a replacement for refined sugars but – where we think there is much more exciting news – we are bringing a real new flavor to the market. It lends itself very well to applications like ice cream, drinks and snacks.

“With WholeFruit, we made a chocolate from 100% pure cocoa fruit and sweetened the chocolate with the pulp. The approach was not to replace the sugar, but to really magnify the taste of the fruit in the chocolate .

Woltering-Valat explains the potential. “We are building a new category of chocolate that meets consumer health and wellness needs because it tastes unique, nutritious and good for the planet, as we now recycle the pulp and outer layer of the fruit .

“As with any new breakthrough, it takes time to establish. Certainly you have to raise awareness, you have to familiarize people with it, experiment and then you convert it to the next level.

Convince consumers

Ultimately, however, it’s all about taste and built-in preferences. Raising awareness around a product like the cocoa fruit, with its unique flavors and environmental credentials, is one thing, but it’s a different ball game to convince consumers accustomed to their favorite chocolate, for example.

“The only challenge we’re going to have in making these products commoditized is what [the cacao fruit] replaces. Sugar is super plentiful and super cheap,” Steve Osborn, director of Aurora Ceres Partnership, a UK-based food and drink consultancy, tells Just Food.

“We can sit here and say idealistically ‘this is great, we get the sweetness from the natural pulp of the cacao fruit, we use all the waste.’ That’s very good and we should welcome this kind of philosophical change.The other aspect, of course, is that we are very attentive to our taste profiles.

Mondelez, Barry Callebaut and Cabosse recognize that their new products are premium priced.

Woltering-Valat de Cabosse says, “Our ability to crack this fruit is really our ability to produce large quantities with very high quality products that preserve the nutritional value and delicious flavors. This comes at a cost, obviously, and we are indeed looking at more premium pricing types.

Price is an issue to overcome if chocolate confectionery, snacks and other emerging cocoa products are to appeal to the mass market.

“You have to get into that main market,” says Osborn. “Otherwise it ends up being a premium niche. And while a high-end niche has its place, there’s always a ripple effect [needed]; how to get consumers to change their taste profile.

“I’m always fascinated to hear about these products. I think it’s the right direction and it’s the right philosophy, but it’s about how we act against this massive trading machine. And that is not easy.

The need for scale

Nestlé’s Barrett says greater scale is needed to reduce costs, especially when it comes to taking a fresh raw material that is 80% water, then drying it and converting it into various products different. “It’s about understanding how we can make it a more commercial supply chain and ingredient,” she says.

However, while Neumann admits that Mondelez CaPao Cacaofruit bites belong to the premium segment, she says that “in the world of confectionery, it depends on how you optimize your formula; you might be adding that ingredient, but there might be another area where you might be able to cut some costs to keep it neutral to the consumer.”

However, from the perspective of farmers, developments could make a difference. They could potentially earn more from the same number of trees, which previously only generated income from the beans used to produce cocoa, with, to return to Neumann’s point, 70% of the fruit being wasted.

Woltering-Valat develops the theme. “We make better use of those resources, but also all the effort they put into growing the fruit, in the energy, in the water, in the time they invested.”

Neumann says the potential for using previously discarded parts of the fruit aligns well with growing awareness of recycling and food waste, both from manufacturers and consumers.

In the United States, for example, the non-profit organization Upcycled Food Association was founded in 2019, formed in its own words by “the upcycled food companies themselves, who recognized the power of collaboration in the growth of a thriving food category and environmental movement”.

SnackFutures by Mondelez is part of this association, which in April launched a product label that would be the world’s first certification mark for recycled foods.

At Nestlé, Barrett says an 80% dark chocolate Incoa variety is on the way, declining to provide further details, while Neumann says CaPao Cacaofruit Bites will be joined in October by a “new format that we’re almost ready to talk about but not quite yet”.

Related companies

]]>
Cocoa fruit juice could be the new hot health drink | Eat Drink https://cacaovm.org/cocoa-fruit-juice-could-be-the-new-hot-health-drink-eat-drink/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/cocoa-fruit-juice-could-be-the-new-hot-health-drink-eat-drink/ Cocoa fruit juice is the latest in the world of chocolate. – Photo by Barry Callebaut via ETX Studio NEW YORK, October 27 – Did you know that chocolate can’t be eaten just in the form of bars or bars? Of course, it can also be tasted as hot chocolate, but have you ever heard […]]]>

Cocoa fruit juice is the latest in the world of chocolate. – Photo by Barry Callebaut via ETX Studio

NEW YORK, October 27 – Did you know that chocolate can’t be eaten just in the form of bars or bars? Of course, it can also be tasted as hot chocolate, but have you ever heard of chocolate juice? Swiss cocoa giant Barry Callebaut has launched a drink made from its flagship ingredient. And that’s probably just the start of a new approach to chocolate.

The cocoa tree fruit is not only eaten once it is turned into chocolate, it can also be sipped in liquid form. The pod, the famous thick shell in which the cocoa beans are found, still white at this stage, contains a white mucilaginous pulp. An ingredient rich in fiber and vitamins that can be used in cocktails to give the body a boost. The cultures of Central America have been drinking this elixir for a long time …

And contrary to what one might imagine, the nectar does not taste like cocoa, but fresh fruit. Evocation of lychee, lemon, exotic fruits, this is how the chocolate makers of Mr. Txokola describe their cocoa juice. The brand based in the French Basque Country launched its recipe less than a year ago. A small bottle, available for sale on the brand’s online store, is priced at € 4 (around 20).

Cocoa fruit juice may be the new hot health drink;

And in Switzerland, the trend has not gone unnoticed! Cocoa juice is becoming a taste (and commercial) phenomenon that should not be overlooked. Presented as a natural antidepressant, antioxidant, source of magnesium … The many virtues of cocoa have been known for decades. The Barry Callebaut group has decided to ride the well-being trend to promote the benefits of its new product: cocoa fruit juice. A few days ago, the Swiss giant unveiled Elix, a so-called functional drink, whose manufacturing process preserves the nutrients of the cocoa fruit. The group is counting on the richness of flavonoids in its new formulation to appeal to consumers looking for a cocoa drink that makes them feel good. This is the first time that Barry Callebaut has entered the so-called nutraceutical market. The brand relies on the ability of its new product to boost blood circulation. More than 15 years of research and development were necessary to develop Elix, which may also be of interest to consumers for its content of magnesium, iron and potassium.

Meanwhile, Swiss brand Koa decided to work with Ghanaian farmers, making the most of the raw material from the pod and ultimately producing juice from the ingredient. The company has teamed up with the prestigious Swiss producer of fine chocolates, Felchlin, to distribute its drink. It is also found in Japan, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Germany. Felchlin even turned cocoa fruit juice into … iced tea!

In the future, the white mucilaginous pulp may even become a feature of the latest trendy recipes on Instagram … The Valrhona chocolate brand won the innovation award at the last Sirha World Hospitality and Food Service for its “ Oabika ”, a concentrated cocoa fruit juice available to chefs for their chocolate creations. Stay tuned. – ETX Studio

]]>
Cocoa fruit juice may be the new hot health drink https://cacaovm.org/cocoa-fruit-juice-may-be-the-new-hot-health-drink/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/cocoa-fruit-juice-may-be-the-new-hot-health-drink/ The fruit of the cocoa tree is not only eaten when transformed into chocolate, it can also be drunk in liquid form. The cocoa pod, the famous thick envelope in which the cocoa beans are located – still white at this stage, contains a mucilaginous white pulp. An ingredient rich in fiber and vitamins that […]]]>

The fruit of the cocoa tree is not only eaten when transformed into chocolate, it can also be drunk in liquid form. The cocoa pod, the famous thick envelope in which the cocoa beans are located – still white at this stage, contains a mucilaginous white pulp. An ingredient rich in fiber and vitamins that can be used in cocktails to give the body a boost. Central American cultures have been drinking this elixir for a long time…

And contrary to what one might imagine, the nectar does not taste of cocoa, but of fresh fruit. Reminiscent of lychee, lemon, exotic fruits, this is how Mr. Txokola’s chocolate makers describe their cocoa juice. The brand based in the French Basque Country launched its recipe less than a year ago. A small bottle, available for sale on the brand’s online store, sells for €4 (around €20).

Cocoa fruit juice may be the new hot health drink;

And in Switzerland, the trend has not gone unnoticed! Cocoa juice is becoming a taste (and commercial) phenomenon that should not be overlooked. Touted as a natural antidepressant, antioxidant, source of magnesium… The many virtues of cocoa have been known for decades. The Barry Callebaut group has decided to ride the well-being trend to highlight the benefits of its new product: Cocoafruit juice. A few days ago, the Swiss giant unveiled Elix, a so-called functional drink, whose manufacturing process preserves the nutrients of the cocoa fruit. The group is counting on the richness in flavonoids of its new formulation to seduce consumers looking for a cocoa drink that does them good. This is the first time that Barry Callebaut has entered the so-called nutriceuticals market. The brand relies on the ability of its new product to boost blood circulation. It took more than 15 years of research and development to develop Elix, which may also appeal to consumers for its magnesium, iron and potassium content.

Meanwhile, Swiss brand Koa decided to work with farmers in Ghana by maximizing the raw material of the pod and ultimately producing a juice from the ingredient. The company has partnered with the prestigious Swiss producer of fine chocolates Felchlin, to distribute its drink. It is also found in Japan, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Germany. Felchlin even transformed the cocoa juice into… ice tea!

In the future, the mucilaginous white pulp could even become the star of the latest trendy recipes on Instagram… The chocolate brand Valrhona won the innovation prize at the last Sirha World Hospitality and Food Service for its “Oabika” , a concentrated cocoa fruit juice made available to chefs for their chocolate creations. Stay tuned. — Studio ETX

]]> Barry Callebaut launches cocoa-based nutraceutical drink https://cacaovm.org/barry-callebaut-launches-cocoa-based-nutraceutical-drink/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/barry-callebaut-launches-cocoa-based-nutraceutical-drink/
Diving brief: Barry Callebaut has a new healthier drink mix made from 100% cocoa fruit that it will make available to manufacturers around the world for use in different types of drinks. The blend, called Elix, was unveiled during a live, virtual event at Hortus Botanicus Amsterdam on Thursday. The cacao fruit is a rich […]]]>

Diving brief:

  • Barry Callebaut has a new healthier drink mix made from 100% cocoa fruit that it will make available to manufacturers around the world for use in different types of drinks. The blend, called Elix, was unveiled during a live, virtual event at Hortus Botanicus Amsterdam on Thursday.
  • The cacao fruit is a rich source of many nutrients, including flavonols – a class of phytochemicals believed to have many potential health benefits, especially for the heart and circulation. The elixir can be drunk on its own – Barry Callebaut CEO Peter Boone said it tastes “sweet and fruity with a slightly sour note” – and it can also be flavored.
  • This launch is the latest product from Barry Callebaut’s focus on using the whole cocoa fruit in products. The company also launched WholeFruit chocolate, made with only cocoa components, and launched a line of cocoa fruit ingredients called Cabosse Naturals.

Overview of the dive:

As Barry Callebaut strives to reduce the wastage of cocoa fruit, 80% of which is thrown away in traditional chocolate making, he is discovering some remarkable aspects of the part of the fruit that is often wasted. With Elix, the company aims to take nutritional benefits and package them in a simple drink format that Boone said many consumers understand: fruit juices.

Elix has already been checked for a heart health claim in Europe, according to Boone. The FDA is currently reviewing a claim, and Boone said he believes it will be approved in the United States early next year.

Flavonols like those in Elix have been proven to help the heart and circulatory system according to Aedin Cassidy, Professor at Queens University Belfast, who spoke at the launch event. Nutrients are correlated with many other positive health effects, such as preventing diabetes and potentially improving cognitive function.

Boone said Elix is ​​aimed specifically at Gen Xers, who are now in their 40s and 50s and at a time in their lives when they are interested in supplements to improve their health. Elix, he said, gives them the opportunity to get some of these necessary nutrients in an all-natural way, although the drink is healthy and beneficial for all age groups, according to the company.

Since Barry Callebaut is a business-to-business ingredient-focused company, it will not produce Elix for consumer sales. Boone wouldn’t say if there are any companies currently developing products with Elix, but he said it takes about 18 months for a product to be designed, perfected and manufactured. Thursday’s event was more of a new ingredient unveiling, not a specific product launch. But Barry Callebaut is ready to supply Elix when manufacturers are ready, Boone said.

The international chocolate ingredients giant probably doesn’t provide much to the better-for-you drinks segment. However, as the category grows, manufacturers are likely clamoring for new ingredients to differentiate their offerings. Not only does the fruity, natural, flavonoid-rich Elix sound unique, it could also appeal to consumers who don’t want an energy jolt from their drink, as well as people recovering from a workout. .

Boone said Barry Callebaut was exploring more innovations, noting that the cocoa fruit contains more than 20,000 compounds and nutrients.

“There’s a lot to tap into,” Boone said. “I’m absolutely sure we’ll find more ingredients that can lead to new product introductions. To be honest, I think we’re starting a journey.”

]]>
Uses and products of cocoa beyond chocolate https://cacaovm.org/uses-and-products-of-cocoa-beyond-chocolate/ Fri, 07 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/uses-and-products-of-cocoa-beyond-chocolate/ VSHocolate is one of the most beloved foods in the world, especially here in the United States, where it can be found everywhere from expensive specialty truffle stores to the dollar store checkout line. But ask the average person how chocolate is made or where it comes from, and there’s a good chance you’ll end […]]]>
VSHocolate is one of the most beloved foods in the world, especially here in the United States, where it can be found everywhere from expensive specialty truffle stores to the dollar store checkout line. But ask the average person how chocolate is made or where it comes from, and there’s a good chance you’ll end up with a shrug and a guess like: Hershey Park?

In fact, chocolate comes from the cocoa fruit, grown near the equator in countries like Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador. While processed chocolate tends to be loaded with added sugar, raw cocoa does not, yes, zero. Here’s another fact about chocolate: only a small part of the cocoa fruit is used to make it.

Although the pulp, juice, and shell of cocoa fruits are not used to produce chocolate, more and more food companies are incorporating these plant parts in creative ways. It not only reduces food waste, but also brings more health benefits, because cocoa fruit is very rich in nutrients.

Read on to find out which brands are using cocoa fruit sustainably, and to find out why it’s so good for you.

Cocoa fruit 101 — and why whole fruits are good for you

Before we get into all the interesting ways to use the cocoa fruit, it helps to know what we are actually talking about in terms of the whole plant. Here is a little anatomy lesson of the cocoa fruit. Cocoa is a large, colorful fruit. It has a hard outer shell which can be red, yellow, green, pink, purple, or orange. If you open its shell, you will see pods. Each has a protective coating, inside of which are the cocoa beans (the seeds of the plant) and the pulp.

“For centuries, only the seeds of the cocoa fruit have been used to make chocolate, which means that around 70 percent of the fruit has been thrown away as waste,” explains Sylvie Woltering-Valat, Marketing Manager at Cabosse Naturals , a brand that puts every part of the fruit to use. It’s an effort that Frances Largeman-Roth, RD, a registered dietitian, says she’s excited to see more happen, as the whole cocoa fruit is packed with nutritional benefits. “Many people already know that cocoa beans [used to make chocolate] are high in antioxidants, but the pulp and juice of the fruit are also high in antioxidants, ”she says. Antioxidants that are linked to heart health, brain health, and the prevention of chronic inflammation, explains Largeman-Roth.

But that’s not the only benefit of consuming more parts of this plant. Largeman-Roth says that the beans, pulp and juice of the fruit also contain magnesium. “Most people don’t get enough magnesium in their diet, and it’s very important for heart health,” she says. “It’s also linked to relaxation and better sleep.”

Like all fruits, cocoa contains fiber, especially the fleshy pulp that is so often thrown away, also points out Largman-Roth. Considering that fiber is so crucial for gut health and preventing chronic inflammation, it’s a shame that the fibrous parts of cocoa plants are usually wasted. But, of course, several brands are working to change that.

How brands are using cocoa fruits in exciting new ways

Cocoa Naturals, Blue Stripes and CaPao are three food brands that strive to use every part of the cocoa fruit, and the result is a wide range of delicious foods and drinks. Before founding Blue Stripes, Oded Brenner was known as one of the best chocolatiers in the world, as the founder of Max Brenner Chocolate. One of the perks of running a chocolate business – besides being a Willie Wonka in real life – is traveling to meet the farmers who grow cocoa. When Brenner went to Ecuador and saw the process firsthand, he realized that there was so much more to the fruit than just making chocolate. So he decided to launch a new brand that did it all.

Blue Stripes offers a wide range of products which includes cocoa water, granola with the fruit pulp as a basic ingredient and even a pancake mix where the cocoa shell is ground into flour. “For me, discovering the cocoa fruit was like becoming Alice in Wonderland; it led me to discover after discovery how it can be used,” says Brenner. Cocoa beans taste completely different from pulp and juice; the last two have a more tropical fruit taste than chocolate. Like other tropical fruits, Brenner has found the pulp to pair perfectly with nuts in the form of granola, energy bites, and bars.

Similar to Blue Stripes, CaPao also incorporates cocoa fruit pulp into bites made with other dried fruits, nuts and seeds. Shannon Neumann, Associate Brand Director, says sustainability is the main driving force behind the business. “We learned that 70 percent of the fruit was going to go to waste and that the other parts of the fruit were also overshadowed by the cocoa beans,” she says. “Cocoa beans create delicious chocolate, but we have seen using [the pulp] as a way to reduce food waste while introducing people to this delicious flavor which is also very good for them. “

The cocoa beans and pulp also pair well, which is exactly what Cacao Barry and Cabosse Naturals (both members of the Barry Callebaut chocolate company) are doing with their new chocolate couverture that chefs can use to create their own. cocoa from fruit. desserts. “Cabosse Naturals recycles everything: the seeds, pulp and skin of the fruit. This means there is no wasted delicacies and wasted nutrition,” Woltering-Valat explains. She adds that even the shell is ground into flour and used in bars.

In addition to reducing food waste, using the whole cocoa fruit means that farmers and producers are also able to profit more, Brenner said. “The owners of these small farmers in Ecuador [where Blue Stripes sources is cacao fruit] can make more money because they don’t just sell the cocoa beans, they sell all the parts of the fruit. Pods cost more than beans, ”he says. Brenner says it’s actually less work for them too because instead of opening the pod and getting the beans, the whole cocoa fruit is shipped to the Blue Stripes manufacturing plant, where he is then processed and transformed into different products.

The tl; dr is this: Using the whole cocoa fruit means more money for farmers, less food waste, and more nutritional benefits for us. It is an all-out victory. But whatever the food “trend,” Largeman-Roth says, it’s important to read labels and research more on companies before spending money to support them. Companies that genuinely support cocoa farmers should highlight this on their website, or even on their packaging. Even better, have a Fair Trade certification, showing that a reputable third party organization holds them accountable for safe working conditions and sustainable practices.

When reading your label, Largeman-Roth says it’s a good idea to watch the sugar and sodium content. Even though cocoa fruits are naturally sweet, you want to be sure that brands don’t add a ton of sugar or salt to what would otherwise be a healthy product. As a general rule of thumb, keep added sugar below 25 grams per day and sodium below 2300 milligrams per day.

With these tips in mind, you are ready to reap the full benefits of cocoa fruits. Trying it is bound to be a (ahem) fruitful experience.

Oh hi! You look like someone who enjoys free workouts, discounts for cult wellness brands, and exclusive Well + Good content. Sign up for Well +, our online community of wellness insiders, and unlock your rewards instantly.

Our editors independently select these products. Making a purchase through our links can earn a Well + Good commission.

]]>
Cocoa fruit uses and products beyond chocolate https://cacaovm.org/cocoa-fruit-uses-and-products-beyond-chocolate/ Fri, 07 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/cocoa-fruit-uses-and-products-beyond-chocolate/ VSChocolate is one of the most beloved foods in the world, especially here in the United States, where it can be found everywhere from expensive specialty truffle shops to the dollar store queue. But ask the average person how chocolate is made or where it comes from, and chances are you’ll encounter a shrug and […]]]>
VSChocolate is one of the most beloved foods in the world, especially here in the United States, where it can be found everywhere from expensive specialty truffle shops to the dollar store queue. But ask the average person how chocolate is made or where it comes from, and chances are you’ll encounter a shrug and a guess like: Hershey Park?

Chocolate actually comes from cacao fruits, which are grown near the equator in countries like Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador. While processed chocolate tends to be loaded with added sugar, raw cocoa has none, yes, zero. Here’s another factoid about chocolate: only a small portion of the cacao fruit is used to make it.

Although the pulp, juice and shell of the cocoa fruit are not used to produce chocolate, more and more food companies are incorporating these parts of the plant in creative ways. This not only reduces food waste, but also brings more health benefits, as cocoa fruits are extremely rich in nutrients.

Keep reading to find out which brands are using cacao fruit sustainably and to find out why it’s so good for you.

Cocoa fruit 101 – and why the together fruit is good for you

Before we get into all the cool ways to use cacao fruits, it helps to know what we’re actually talking about in terms of the whole plant. Here is a little lesson in the anatomy of the cocoa fruit. Cocoa is a large, colorful fruit. It has a hard outer shell that can be red, yellow, green, pink, purple, or orange. If you open its shell, you will see pods. Each has a protective shell, inside which are the cocoa beans (the seeds of the plant) and the pulp.

“For centuries, only the seeds of the cocoa fruit were used to make chocolate, which meant that around 70% of the fruit was thrown away as waste,” says Sylvie Woltering-Valat, marketing manager at Cabosse Naturals, a brand who does everything. part of the fruit to use. It’s an effort registered dietitian Frances Largeman-Roth, RD, says she’s thrilled to see more happening because the whole cocoa fruit is full of nutritional benefits. “Many people already know that cocoa beans [used to make chocolate] are high in antioxidants, but the pulp and juice of the fruit are also high in antioxidants,” she says. Antioxidants that are linked to heart health, brain health and preventing chronic inflammation, says Largeman-Roth.

But that’s not the only benefit of consuming more parts of this plant. Largeman-Roth says the seeds, pulp and juice of the fruit also contain magnesium. “Most people don’t get enough magnesium in their diet, and it’s very important for heart health,” she says. “It’s also linked to relaxation and better sleep.”

Like all fruits, cocoa contains fiber, especially the fleshy pulp that is so often thrown away, Largman-Roth also points out. Considering fiber is so crucial for gut health and preventing chronic inflammation, it’s a shame that the fibrous parts of cocoa plants are typically wasted. But, of course, several brands are working to change that.

How brands are using cacao fruits in exciting new ways

Cabosse Naturals, Blue Stripes and CaPao are three food brands that strive to use every part of the cacao fruit, and the result is a wide range of delicious foods and beverages. Prior to founding Blue Stripes, Oded Brenner was known as one of the finest chocolatiers in the world, as the founder of Max Brenner Chocolate. One of the perks of running a chocolate business—apart from being a real Willie Wonka—is being able to travel to meet the farmers who grow the cacao fruit. When Brenner traveled to Ecuador and saw the process firsthand, he realized that the fruit was much more than just making chocolate. So he decided to launch a new brand that did it all.

Blue Stripes offers a wide range of products including cocoa water, granola with the fruit pulp as the base ingredient and even a pancake mix where the cocoa shell is ground into flour. “For me, learning about the cacao fruit was like becoming Alice in Wonderland; it led me to discover after discovery how it can be used,” says Brenner. Cocoa beans taste completely different from pulp and juice; the last two have a more tropical fruit flavor than a chocolate. Like other tropical fruits, Brenner has found that the pulp pairs well with nuts in the form of granola, energy bites and bars.

Similar to Blue Stripes, CaPao also incorporates cocoa fruit pulp into bites made with other dried fruits, nuts and seeds. Shannon Neumann, Associate Brand Director, says sustainability is the company’s main driver. “We learned that 70% of the fruit was going to go to waste and the other parts of the fruit were also overshadowed by the cocoa beans,” she says. “Cocoa beans make delicious chocolate, but we’ve seen [the pulp] as a way to reduce food waste while introducing people to this delicious flavor that is also very good for them.”

Cocoa beans and pulp also pair well, which is exactly what Cacao Barry and Cabosse Naturals (both members of the Barry Callebaut chocolate company) are doing with their new chocolate couverture that chefs can use to create their own own fruit-based cocoa. desserts. “Cabosse Naturals recycles everything: the seeds, pulp and skin of the fruit. This means there is no wasted deliciousness and no wasted nutrition,” says Woltering-Valat. She adds that even the shell is ground into flour and used in bars.

In addition to reducing food waste, using the whole cocoa fruit means farmers and growers can also reap more benefits, says Brenner. “The owners of these small farmers in Ecuador [where Blue Stripes sources is cacao fruit] can make more money because they don’t just sell the cocoa beans, they sell all parts of the fruit. The pods have a higher price than the beans,” he says. Brenner says it’s actually less work for them too because instead of opening the pod and getting the beans, the whole cocoa fruit is shipped to the Blue Stripes manufacturing plant, where it is then processed and transformed into different products.

The tl;dr is this: using the whole cocoa fruit means more money for farmers, less food waste and more nutritional benefits for us. It is an overall victory. But for any food “trend,” Largeman-Roth says it’s important to read labels and learn more about companies before shelling out your cash to support them. Companies that truly support cocoa fruit growers should highlight this on their website, if not on their packaging. Even better, have fair trade certification, showing that a reputable third-party organization holds them accountable for safe working conditions and sustainable practices.

When reading your label, Largeman-Roth says it’s a good idea to watch for sugar and sodium content. Even though the cacao fruit is naturally sweet, you want to make sure the brands aren’t adding a ton of sugar or salt to what would otherwise be a healthy product. As a general rule, keep added sugar to less than 25 grams per day and sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams per day.

With these tips in mind, you’re ready to fully enjoy the fruits of cocoa. Trying it is bound to be an (ahem) fruitful experience.

Oh hi! You sound like someone who loves free workouts, discounts on cult wellness brands, and exclusive Well+Good content. Join Well+, our online community of wellness insiders, and unlock your rewards instantly.

Our editors independently select these products. Making a purchase through our links may earn Well+Good a commission.

]]>
‘Pacha de Cacao – an uplifting story about the mighty cocoa fruit’ https://cacaovm.org/pacha-de-cacao-an-uplifting-story-about-the-mighty-cocoa-fruit/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/pacha-de-cacao-an-uplifting-story-about-the-mighty-cocoa-fruit/ New name, new identity My start-up has undergone profound changes. First of all, on the name, it changed from Freebird to…. Pacha de Cacao! We are challenging the industry by using cocoa pulp – now waste – as the main ingredient. Not the cocoa beans. For more than 500 years, since Columbus brought back exotic […]]]>

New name, new identity

My start-up has undergone profound changes. First of all, on the name, it changed from Freebird to…. Pacha de Cacao!

We are challenging the industry by using cocoa pulp – now waste – as the main ingredient. Not the cocoa beans. For more than 500 years, since Columbus brought back exotic cocoa beans after one of his New World trips, the industry has looked only for beans. It is time to change that.

“Pacha de Cacao” comes from “Pachamama”, which means “Mother Earth” in the Quechua language. A very powerful concept in all Latin American countries, especially in those where the Quechua language is still spoken by indigenous tribes.

A lot of people are frustrated with the lack of authenticity and action of big brands. They want to connect to a story that’s real and new

By adding the Spanish words “de Cacao” to the mixture, the meaning comes from “The world of cocoa”. The name fits well with the underlying purpose of our business, while also opening the conversation to consumers about the powerful cocoa fruit; its origins, its impact and all the beautiful traditions that surround it. I like to talk about these stories.

I think it’s time for consumers to hear a more positive story about cocoa. That’s why I opted for an uplifting visual identity, inspired by ethnic motifs and the Amazon rainforest. The aim is to draw people to an exotic world in a modern and elegant interpretation, with a fresh and positive look and feel. The designers did a great job telling this story.

]]>
Xoca creates a functional drink brand around recycled cocoa https://cacaovm.org/xoca-creates-a-functional-drink-brand-around-recycled-cocoa/ Fri, 13 Dec 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/xoca-creates-a-functional-drink-brand-around-recycled-cocoa/ Launch in Chicago, XocaComes in three flavors: original, mint and ginger, and is the brainchild of Jacob Lopata, a propulsion engineer with an aviation background who learned that hundreds of thousands of tons of cocoa fruit rot in farms every year via a friend who owns a chocolate business in Ecuador and felt a business […]]]>

Launch in Chicago, XocaComes in three flavors: original, mint and ginger, and is the brainchild of Jacob Lopata, a propulsion engineer with an aviation background who learned that hundreds of thousands of tons of cocoa fruit rot in farms every year via a friend who owns a chocolate business in Ecuador and felt a business opportunity.

“600,000 tonnes of cocoa fruit pulp is thrown away every year and I felt like it was a huge waste and an environmental problem.”

While some brands like Reused podhave launched 100% cocoa fruit juice products, Suavvatried to familiarize Americans with the fruit via smoothies, and Mondelēz is now experimenting with concentrated cocoa pulp extract in a new line of snacks called Capao,It hasn’t (yet) become the next “superfruit,” in part because the juice is so perishable, Lopata said.

“If you don’t do anything with it, things will go wrong very quickly. Once the pods are opened, you have approximately 24 hours.

“I can’t talk about it too much at this point but it’s a reduction in fruit juice [via a heating process] it creates something similar to molasses or honey in terms of consistency and once we do that it’s stable. The cocoa fruit naturally has a sort of tropical fruit flavor, but the reduction process also adds additional flavor notes and a hint of molasses.

]]>