Cacao culture – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 04:25:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://cacaovm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-150x150.png Cacao culture – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ 32 32 Culinary Culture – COOL HUNTING® https://cacaovm.org/culinary-culture-cool-hunting/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 00:26:03 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/culinary-culture-cool-hunting/ The inaugural release of The Macallan’s new limited edition Harmony Collection, Rich Cacao Single Malt Scotch Whiskey offers a delicious profile of fine chocolates, cinnamon and dried fruit. For this first expression of what will become an annual series, Macallan’s whiskey-maker Polly Logan has collaborated with Girona, the pastry chef based in Spain Jordi Roca […]]]>

The inaugural release of The Macallan’s new limited edition Harmony Collection, Rich Cacao Single Malt Scotch Whiskey offers a delicious profile of fine chocolates, cinnamon and dried fruit. For this first expression of what will become an annual series, Macallan’s whiskey-maker Polly Logan has collaborated with Girona, the pastry chef based in Spain Jordi Roca of the restaurant El Celler de Can Roc three Michelin stars and owner…

To buy

Chez Diane, a design studio founded by drag artist Steak Diane, offers a friendly and refreshing take on classic gingham placemats. Made in New York, Les Huîtres features embroidered oysters and a lemon wedge on a double-layered 100% cotton fabric. Imbued with as much joy, humor and life as Diane herself, these table sets can be purchased either as a single rug or as a set …

To buy

After family members were hospitalized with alcoholism, Evan Quinn and George Youmans founded Hiyo, a healthy alternative to alcohol. Hiyo’s Sparkling Tonics deliver delicious flavors and mood-boosting organic adaptogens, all anchored by mild carbonation. Throughout their variations (which include peach mango, watermelon lime and ripe lemon), these refreshing drinks contain a multitude of beneficial herbs, such as ashwagandha to regulate cortisol levels and relieve stress, lion’s mane …

To buy

MADRE’s handmade towels are designed and produced in Portland from linen grown in Belgium and woven in Lithuania. Composed of rich colors, they feature mitered edges in contrasting hues. Available in different sizes and sets of two, four, or eight, they work as matching collections, but the colors are also gorgeous mixed together.

To buy

The original pasta design of the Sporkful, called Cascatelli and produced by Sfoglini, perfectly offers workability, sausability and dentability. This four pack of Cascatelli can be split between family and friends or kept for yourself.

To buy

Between the gender disparity in distilleries and cocktails associated with femininity, the drink culture has long been dictated by patriarchy. Mallory O’Meara’s Girly Drinks compels this gender divide to be considered, highlighting the neglected women behind brews and booze. From an ancient Sumerian goddess of beer to iconic bartender Ada Coleman, this book reveals the feminist history of alcohol.

To buy

Refreshing, tangy and slightly sparkling, Greenpoint Cidery 2020 We’re Laughing features notes of cranberries, raspberries and green brambles. Named after a song by the Psychedelic Aliens, this limited edition cider is fermented in the Hudson Valley in a farmhouse style. This artisanal cider, made with all locally sourced ingredients, is imbued with the naturally bright terroir of upstate New York.

To buy

Designed by Aruliden, this colorful set of six coasters does more than protect a surface from moisture. Temperature and scratch resistant TPU discs can be bound in a range of sculptural combinations, when not in use. They are a vibrant addition to any kitchen or dining room, whether used for a cocktail party or with a morning coffee.

To buy

Inspired by the traditional Korean Dolsot bowls used for bibimbap, this set, consisting of a stoneware bowl, bamboo cover and chopsticks, is designed to bring back the joy of the house. When in use, lifting the lid of the heat storage bowl reveals a cloud of vapor, a moment that Hong Kong-founded housewares brand JIA Inc designed to evoke memories of sitting down to a dinner. House. While being minimalist in aesthetics …

To buy

With a mission to bring tranquility to people’s daily rituals, Lisa Li founded The Qi, a tea brand that uses whole flowers. Sourced from small family farms, the high quality flowers are hand picked, sustainably grown and organically grown. The Tri-Bouquet Set is an enchanting set of naturally caffeine-free teas made up of three flowers: Blue Lotus, Shangri-La Rose and Royal Chrysanthemum. In addition, the package includes a …

To buy

Organized by award-winning chef and activist Bryant Terry and published by 4 Color Books, Black Food: Stories, Art, and Recipes from Across the African Diaspora (A Cookbook) travels through time and place to capture the expansive multiplicities of black culture. Through recipes, poetry, artwork and essays that explore food’s intrinsic connection to community and history within the diaspora, this rich cookbook encompasses the work of more …

To buy

Panamanian drummer and music producer Jahphet “Jah” Negast Landis (also known as Roofeeo) founded Jah Mama Sauce in honor of his late mother and his original hot sauce recipe. Blending her memories of her and their home into a sensory and spicy experience, the eponymous sauce consists of selected Scotch Bonnet peppers (popular in the Caribbean and measuring around 80,000-400,000 on …

To buy

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A Holiday Gift Guide Spotlighting Local Athens Businesses | Arts & Culture https://cacaovm.org/a-holiday-gift-guide-spotlighting-local-athens-businesses-arts-culture/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:15:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/a-holiday-gift-guide-spotlighting-local-athens-businesses-arts-culture/ With the holidays quickly approaching, Athenians may want to get a head start on gift shopping. The Red & Black has compiled a holiday gift guide that will help you find the best suited gift for the people you care about. For the metaphysical practitioner Margo Metaphysical does not only sell crystals and stones, but […]]]>

With the holidays quickly approaching, Athenians may want to get a head start on gift shopping. The Red & Black has compiled a holiday gift guide that will help you find the best suited gift for the people you care about.

For the metaphysical practitioner

Margo Metaphysical does not only sell crystals and stones, but also offers a variety of jewelry that would make the perfect gifts.

Crystal necklaces, rings, earrings and bracelets are all available starting at just $ 5. An amethyst necklace would be perfect for those seeking serenity and grace, while an unakite crystal bracelet would be a great help for those who wish to develop themselves.

For the bookworm

Book lovers everywhere will appreciate the Snail Mail Surprise service from Avid Bookshop. After answering a few questions about the gift recipient, such as which books he likes to read and even what his zodiac sign is, a bookseller will choose a book curated according to his taste to surprise him in the mail. Options range from $ 20 for a single paperback to $ 99 for three hardcover books, all in mint condition.

For the chocolate lover

Condor chocolates will satisfy even the most stubborn sweet tooth. In addition to the traditional chocolate bar, the local shop also sells assorted boxes of truffles for $ 18. He even sells gift boxes such as the $ 35 Baker’s Box which includes cocoa nibs, chocolate chips and cocoa powder and the $ 40 Condor Sampler Box which includes caramel, a chocolate bar and a box of truffles.

For the person you can’t understand

The eco-friendly Community store sells prefabricated gift boxes starting at $ 42. All products are locally sourced from Athens.

The $ 45 Athens Care Box is perfect for anyone who might need to take care of themselves this holiday season, filled with goodies such as a bath bomb from Normal Soap Company and chocolate au Condor Chocolates Honeycomb Caramel. For those looking to splurge, the $ 85 Athens Classics box includes the most items, ranging from a jar of Provisions Piedmont fruit preserves to a 12 oz. 1000 Faces Coffee Company coffee grounds package.

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Why North Korea is not happy with the soft power of South Korean pop culture https://cacaovm.org/why-north-korea-is-not-happy-with-the-soft-power-of-south-korean-pop-culture/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 12:36:13 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/why-north-korea-is-not-happy-with-the-soft-power-of-south-korean-pop-culture/ Scott, let’s start with the basics. What do we know about 0micron, and what don’t we know? There are three big questions, and we have a decent understanding around two of them. First, transmissibility – it’s spreading everywhere and it’s hard to see anything that can stop it. It is rapidly surpassing the delta in […]]]>

Scott, let’s start with the basics. What do we know about 0micron, and what don’t we know?

There are three big questions, and we have a decent understanding around two of them.

First, transmissibility – it’s spreading everywhere and it’s hard to see anything that can stop it. It is rapidly surpassing the delta in the US, UK, Denmark and possibly many other countries in the coming weeks.

Second, vaccines – all vaccines, but especially mRNA ones, still seem to reduce the risk of serious illness and death even without a booster (although less than with previous variants). But they fight mightily against a highly contagious variant. which can get into your nose even before your immune system has time to respond. Boosting mRNA (and possibly others) should restore some protection against even mild infection and transmission, but it is not known for how long.

Third, severity – the most debated and misunderstood issue of the three. There is already a cottage industry of hot dishes. My lukewarm opinion has always been that this question would take the longest to answer and require a ton of caveats – we still can’t really answer this conclusively with delta. And delta has shown lower rates of hospitalization and death per case in places with high levels of vaccination or previous infection, although the variant itself is unlikely to be fundamentally less severe.

For omicron, this could also be the case. It appears, however, that South Africa is experiencing a less severe epidemic. And it is proven to replicate less well in the lungs. Both of these things are positive signals, but the reality is that we just don’t know yet and won’t know for at least a few weeks with data from other countries.

South Africa appears to have peaked quickly, is that likely to be the same elsewhere?

We have to be very careful about generalizing the South African experience – the demographic and epidemiological profile is very specific. A rapid rise and fall like this is certainly not out of the question in many places, but remember: the delta is still bouncing around twelve months after it was first identified, and it has spread much faster than previous variants. . There will not be a single timeline for all countries or regions within countries.

Is the timing and nature of the omicron changing the types of policy challenges governments face in addressing them?

For two years we have been in an already exhausting and painful pandemic. The longer it drags on, the more it creates political divisions, compromising the development of coordinated and evidence-based policies. Overall, rich countries may be able to cushion the shock of further disruption with more fiscal stimulus, but the policy environment for doing so continues to deteriorate. Less wealthy countries don’t even have that luxury.

To the right. What about things like vaccination warrants, lockdowns and schools?

Many countries have decided that immunization mandates are the best of a bad set of options to curb the spread. This position is unlikely to change, but it will get more complicated with questions about what constitutes a “fully immunized” and what vaccines qualify under the warrants.

School is a delicate matter. Some are likely to be able to stay safely open, thanks to testing, ventilation, vaccination and small class sizes. But not all, and a general policy to keep all schools open would overlook low-resource schools where many children go home to multigenerational households where grandparents are the caretakers because parents have to work and can’t do it on Zoom.

What did you think of President Biden’s omicron speech on Tuesday?

It’s hard to know exactly who he’s trying to reach at this point, as so many people have been leaning into their respective positions. He’s right to point out the risks to the unvaccinated, but shaming them probably won’t move the needle much and may embolden opposition to the vaccine. Building health care capacity with federal resources, including the military, should help hard-hit areas. But if things go wrong in too many places, it can be more of a band-aid on a gaping wound. And sending 500 million tests to people’s homes is a great idea – twelve months ago. The consistent underperformance of testing remains a big unforced error for the United States’ public health response. Better late than never I guess.

Is there a world in which Omicron is bringing us more quickly to the endemic nuisance stage of the pandemic?

This world exists. I wouldn’t expect to wake up to it in the coming weeks. This best scenario remains possible in the medium term: that is, this variant causes much less hospital strain than previous waves and builds a wall of immunity against serious illnesses high enough to prevent hospitals from overflowing again. .

“If it bleeds, it leads” is a popular saying in journalism. But one of the interesting things about this pandemic is that there is an incredible demand for good news as well, and it can (again) lead to a false sense of security and mission accomplished bias. We must therefore be careful not to smoke too much this sweet hopium ™.

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Pop culture highlights from across the region https://cacaovm.org/pop-culture-highlights-from-across-the-region/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/pop-culture-highlights-from-across-the-region/ Hany Abu-Assad’s ‘Salon de Huda’ continues the director’s tradition of questioning himself LONDON: If a story makes Hany Abu-Assad wake up in the middle of the night, it’s fair to say it’s probably worth telling. The Oscar-nominated and Golden Globe-winning director recalls waking up at 4 a.m. and spending the next four hours drafting the […]]]>

Hany Abu-Assad’s ‘Salon de Huda’ continues the director’s tradition of questioning himself

LONDON: If a story makes Hany Abu-Assad wake up in the middle of the night, it’s fair to say it’s probably worth telling. The Oscar-nominated and Golden Globe-winning director recalls waking up at 4 a.m. and spending the next four hours drafting the idea for what would become “Huda’s Room,” a drama by tense espionage that will open the Red Sea International Film Festival on December 6 – after a conversation with his wife and longtime production partner, Amira Diab.

“I got this story about a salon that recruited Palestinian girls to work for the occupation secret service by putting them in a shameful situation and blackmailing them,” Abu-Assad told Arab News .

“Huda’s Salon” is the tense, character-driven story of Reem, a young mother who visits a Bethlehem business for a haircut and finds herself trapped by salon owner Huda, unless she is. agrees to spy for the occupation. (Provided)

“It was in the papers, and I was struck by it. It stuck in my head. Two years ago my wife wanted to explore something about women in Palestine, and I told her about this idea, ”he recalls. “She asked me what the story was, and I didn’t know. So we slept on it. Then I woke up at 4 a.m. and started writing. During the night my head had to work on it.

“Huda’s Salon” is the tense, character-driven story of Reem, a young mother who visits a Bethlehem business for a haircut and finds herself trapped by salon owner Huda, unless she is. agrees to spy for the occupation. At the same time, Abu-Assad’s film focuses on Hasan’s interrogation of Huda, who begins to understand the gravity of the impossible situation facing a woman also trapped in the shame of her past actions.

Abu-Assad is such a comfortable director with making documentary, biographical and fictional films, but “Huda’s living room,” he explained, could only have been done as a story.

Abu-Assad is such a comfortable director with making documentary, biographical and fictional films, but “Huda’s living room,” he explained, could only have been done as a story. (Provided)

“A documentary would have been impossible. I don’t think victims would want to talk to me because of the issues they would still face if they did. And, of course, the secret services are not going to talk about it, ”he explained. “In fact, one of the only victims who came forward 15 or 20 years ago wrote a letter and then committed suicide. So a fictional story was the only way.

“But the way I shot the film was like a documentary,” he continued. “Most of the scenes are in one shot, where the audience feels like they’re trapped at the same time and place as the characters. We walk with the characters, we sit with them. When there are no mounts, you live alongside them, second by second. You are almost a mirror to them. And it’s also shot with a handheld, which adds to that feeling.

In order to pull off such a feat, Abu-Assad needed actors he could trust to control the scenes, who were able to drive the story for the audience to follow. To this end, the director wrote the roles of actors with whom he had previously worked: Maisa Abd Elhadi (Reem), Manal Awad (Huda) and Ali Suliman (Hasan).

“Huda’s salon” was quite new, stimulating and frightening for Abu-Assad. (Provided)

“I called them all after I got the story but before I started the script,” he explained. “I told them the idea and that I wouldn’t write it down unless they were involved – especially Maisa, as she needed to be vulnerable, not only physically but emotionally. It takes courageous actors to do that.

The close-up and often claustrophobic nature of the film is a far cry from the previous Abu-Assad film, “The Mountain Between Us” of 2017, starring Idris Elba and Kate Winslet. But that’s in line with his commitment to pick projects that challenge – and scare – him.

“That’s why I love him. Without challenge, I cannot do this job. It’s tough, but I’ve always challenged myself to go to extremes and discover new things. I don’t want to do another version of the previous “Paradise Now” or “Omar” movies. I have to find something new, and I might fail, but at least I’ll learn.

“Huda’s salon” was quite new, stimulating and frightening for Abu-Assad.

Legend

“Making an entire movie in two locations, with three characters, almost always in one shot, with a handheld – which I had never done before – was definitely a learning process. You have no idea if it’s going to work, if a plan is going to work in favor of the story or the characters, ”he said. “But otherwise, you’re working on autopilot. You know what’s going to happen because you’ve done it before, and you know what mistakes you’ve made, so you don’t do them again. It gets boring.

The next step for Abu-Assad – and one of the reasons for his involvement in the Red Sea International Film Festival – is the desire to continue to challenge and learn.

“For the past eight years, I have worked with my wife, and we are excited to explore the Arab world, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, to expand our borders beyond Palestine. We have several ideas, and we want to explore them with producers from the Arab world. I can not wait.

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Sudbury Chocolate Maker Brings Indigenous Culture Into Her Work https://cacaovm.org/sudbury-chocolate-maker-brings-indigenous-culture-into-her-work/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/sudbury-chocolate-maker-brings-indigenous-culture-into-her-work/ Tammy Maki from Raven Rising – Global Indigenous Chocolates and Pastry aims to educate and delight with her delicious treats The Ontario Legislature Gift Shop will be the last place in Canada to offer Sudbury chocolate Raven Rising – Indigenous chocolates and pastries from around the world. Red Seal Pastry Chef Tammy Maki launched the […]]]>

Tammy Maki from Raven Rising – Global Indigenous Chocolates and Pastry aims to educate and delight with her delicious treats

The Ontario Legislature Gift Shop will be the last place in Canada to offer Sudbury chocolate Raven Rising – Indigenous chocolates and pastries from around the world.

Red Seal Pastry Chef Tammy Maki launched the company in 2020 after returning to Sudbury in Western Canada.

The 57-year-old has a long history in the chocolate and baking scene, having studied at Cambrian College before heading west, zigzagging to work in luxury hotels from Alberta to British Columbia . molecular gastronomy, which is the culinary study of the transformation of food when it is cooked.

Maki decided to return east and be closer to his family in 2019, after being diagnosed with Ménière’s disease, which causes uncontrollable dizziness and hearing loss. She now has a daughter and her family to lean on for extra support.

The plan was to start a wedding cake and baking consultancy business in Sudbury. It was short lived when the pandemic struck.

“Wedding cakes were obsolete without marriage. I was completely depressed. Here I was in my 50s without work, ”she said.

Add to that, Maki, a victim of the 60s scoop, wanted to start a chocolate business as a positive way to share and educate others about indigenous traditions.

Although she admits that her foster family was very loving, the events of the 1960s saw her and her brothers taken from the White Bear First Nation in Saskatchewan and scattered across the country.

“A chocolate business has always been on my mind, just like finding my biological family or finding my native self,” Maki said. “I use chocolate to raise awareness in a comfortable, non-political way.”

Maki now uses traditional ingredients in their chocolate and sources from native businesses. Her chocolates often contain items like Hairy Skunk Red Current, which taste like a cross between a cranberry and a raspberry. Alder kittens, wild bergamot and mountain mint are all imported from certified suppliers for bars.

His artistic chocolates also feature Callebaut chocolate and cocoa berries, equivalent to fair trade, from Cocoa Horizons. It ensures that indigenous farmers in other countries are paid fairly for their work.

Then there is the packaging. Maki is experimenting with plant-based and compostable ways to present her chocolate, with the goal of being more environmentally friendly and feeling good about protecting Mother Earth.

“I have never had a shared culture (with me), no stories of Elders. Just like my career moving here and there, I do aboriginal discovery.

While Maki sold truffles locally to Nickel refill and the Science North gift shop, most of his business is elsewhere since his shop is virtual.
Her good friend Priscilla, who helped her name the company, is in Western Canada and spreads the word in the West.

In the south, a kitchen supply store sells its chocolate. She has also been featured in subscriptions to Toronto-based Let’s Go Eco box. Luxury department store Holt Renfrew presented Maki and her chocolate in a pop-up sale to mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, also known as Orange Shirt Day, on September 30.

And to the east, a First Nations community in New Brunswick contacted her about sales in their gift shop.

Further growth and expansion depends on locating a permanent production space rather than the continued use of certified leased kitchens. Maki needs a cool place without humidity and is currently investigating the sites. She said that education, survival and her legacy depended on it.

If you want to order Raven Rising chocolate or pastry, or join its local Ajijaak Chocolate monthly membership club, visit RavenRising.ca. Maki products can now also be purchased on the Ontario Legislature Gift Shop website.

Anastasia Rioux is a freelance writer in Greater Sudbury.

– Sudbury.com

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Taste Makers profiles immigrant female chefs in American culinary culture https://cacaovm.org/taste-makers-profiles-immigrant-female-chefs-in-american-culinary-culture/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/taste-makers-profiles-immigrant-female-chefs-in-american-culinary-culture/ Is there a particular dish that you cook when you feel most connected to Iran? NB: Fesenjun. It is native to northern Iran, where there are a lot of birds, although it is by the Caspian. So they cook the duck with pomegranates and walnut sauce. But I’m from Tehran and I remember my mom […]]]>

Is there a particular dish that you cook when you feel most connected to Iran?

NB: Fesenjun. It is native to northern Iran, where there are a lot of birds, although it is by the Caspian. So they cook the duck with pomegranates and walnut sauce. But I’m from Tehran and I remember my mom cooking turkey and sautéing it with salt, pepper, turmeric and saffron, of course. Each dish has saffron. Back then the sauce was made with a mortar and pestle, but now I make it in a food processor. And my mom used fresh squeezed pomegranate juice, which gives such a great flavor. You slowly cook the turkey all day, let the meat come off the bones. I keep the integrity and shape of the turkey, but the sauce infuses it. It is adorable.

How do you think people can relate to a culture through food?

MRS: So Najmieh is only one of the two surviving subjects in my book, the other being Julie Sahni. Even though I spent time with lots of memoirs, cookbooks, and interviews from these deceased personalities, one guideline I detected is that the taste would reveal so many memories of a house they left behind. them. Food is one of the first ways so many immigrants to America first establish a sense of belonging in a new country.

This was certainly true when my mother arrived here from a village in West Bengal after having an arranged marriage with my late father. Just being an Indian in New Jersey in the early 1980s must have been unbelievably difficult. She worked so that I could live a comfortable life. Cooking was one of the ways she was able to establish a sense of coziness in an otherwise very disorienting time. This is true of all the women in this book and I hope the readers will see it.

NB: Identity is linked to culture rather than geographic location for immigrant communities. And they can define themselves through their food, their music and their culture. This reduces the pain of being away. Now people start to speak Persian from their childhood and it was not like that 40 years ago. So when you identify yourself through your culture or heritage, it can really help you as an immigrant family. And I think that by eating Indian food, your mother’s food, you are embracing your roots.

Were you able to cook and eat together during this process?

MRS: I came back to visit him in April 2019 and observed his cook. I don’t know what you know about it, but I’m not a skilled cook at all. One of the things I love about having Najmieh in the kitchen is that she made me feel very comfortable. I remember maybe it was onions on the stove or something but I was just tumbling them on the heat so quickly. And she just told me to take my time and, you know, be patient. And even that kind of little lesson taught me so much about how to be a cook.

NB: I know my job, I like to give people the means to cook. Being a cook as a woman was not very popular, don’t forget that. About 30 years ago I wrote my first cookbook Food of life. And people would meet us and say, “Najmieh, what are you doing? I would say, “I’m a cook. My mom was so upset. She said, “Don’t say you’re a cook, that’s insulting. And she said I should tell them I’m a writer. [Laughs] So even my mom didn’t like what I was doing because it was kind of scolded. Bless his heart. She’s not alive, but I think she’s over now. She would really appreciate Mayukh’s book.

I’m sure she would love this book and, Mayukh, your dad would love it too. It is very special. What do you hope readers take away from it?

MRS: I really appreciate that. I’m sure a lot of people would see the list in this book and say, “Oh wow. I’m so curious about how America has become this “melting pot” of different cuisines around the world. How come we can get saag paneer on one block, then enchiladas on the next, then double down on the next one? It’s very romantic to see America in these terms, as a wonderfully diverse culinary melting pot.

But I hope readers understand that there are so many struggles embedded in this reality that consumers are now taking advantage. Najmieh’s story is a powerful example of how much people had to struggle to make this reality possible. He is someone who had to fight very, very hard in a difficult time in America for the Iranians. She, despite her credentials, was unable to sell her own cookbook to a major publisher. And so she had to become very self-sufficient with the help of her husband, Mohammad. Together, they pursued this path so independent of these powerful institutions. Najmieh became a trailblazer and she ultimately triumphed. But it was not easy.

NB: My point of view is to follow your passion and not worry about what other people think. People will notice what you have done eventually. English is not my language, I have dyslexia, I’m a Muslim, I’m a woman, all of those things, but I got it right. So I think it can be a good example for other women. They can do it too.

I taught homeless women in Washington how to cook for a few years and wanted to teach them sweet carrot rice flavored with orange blossom. But the program director said they wouldn’t know what orange blossom is and wouldn’t include it. But I did it anyway. A woman approached me afterwards, kissed my hand, and told me that she wanted to cook and write books someday. This experience touched me with love. You can make an impact if you stay true to yourself.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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Let’s eat! Sudbury Chocolate Maker Brings Indigenous Culture Into Her Work https://cacaovm.org/lets-eat-sudbury-chocolate-maker-brings-indigenous-culture-into-her-work/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/lets-eat-sudbury-chocolate-maker-brings-indigenous-culture-into-her-work/ Tammy Maki from Raven Rising – Global Indigenous Chocolates and Pastry aims to educate and delight her delicious treats The Ontario Legislature Gift Shop will be the last place in Canada to offer Sudbury chocolate Raven Rising – Indigenous chocolates and pastries from around the world. Red Seal Pastry Chef Tammy Maki launched the business […]]]>

Tammy Maki from Raven Rising – Global Indigenous Chocolates and Pastry aims to educate and delight her delicious treats

The Ontario Legislature Gift Shop will be the last place in Canada to offer Sudbury chocolate Raven Rising – Indigenous chocolates and pastries from around the world.

Red Seal Pastry Chef Tammy Maki launched the business in 2020 after returning to Sudbury in Western Canada.

The 57-year-old has a long history in the chocolate and baking scene, having studied at Cambrian College before heading west, zigzagging to work in luxury hotels from Alberta to British Columbia . molecular gastronomy, which is the culinary study of the transformation of food when it is cooked.

Maki decided to return to the East and be closer to his family in 2019, after being diagnosed with Ménière’s disease, which causes uncontrollable dizziness and hearing loss. She now has a daughter and her family to lean on for additional support.

The plan was to start a wedding cake and baking consultancy business in Sudbury. It was short lived when the pandemic struck.

“Wedding cakes were obsolete without marriage. I was completely depressed. Here I was in my 50s without work, ”she said.

Add to that, Maki, a victim of the 60s scoop, wanted to start a chocolate business as a positive way to share and educate others about indigenous traditions.

Although she admits that her foster family were very loving, the events of the 1960s saw her and her brothers taken from the White Bear First Nation in Saskatchewan and scattered across the country.

“A chocolate business has always been on my mind, just like finding my biological family or finding my native self,” Maki said. “I use chocolate to raise awareness in a comfortable, non-political way.”

Maki now uses traditional ingredients in their chocolate and sources from native businesses. Her chocolates often contain items like Hairy Skunk Red Current, which taste like a cross between a cranberry and a raspberry. Alder kittens, wild bergamot, and mountain mint are all imported from certified suppliers for bass.

His artistic chocolates also feature Callebaut chocolate and cocoa berries, equivalent to fair trade, from Cocoa Horizons. It ensures that indigenous farmers in other countries are paid fairly for their work.

Then there is the packaging. Maki is experimenting with plant-based and compostable ways to present her chocolate, with the goal of being more environmentally friendly and feeling good about protecting Mother Earth.

“I have never had a shared culture (with me), no stories of Elders. Just like my career moving here and there, I do aboriginal discovery.

While Maki sold truffles locally to Nickel refill and the Science North gift shop, most of his business is elsewhere since his shop is virtual.
Her good friend Priscilla, who helped her name the company, is in Western Canada and spreads the word in the West.

In the south, a kitchen supply store sells its chocolate. She has also been featured in subscriptions to Toronto-based Let’s Go Eco box. Luxury department store Holt Renfrew presented Maki and her chocolate at a pop-up sale to mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, also known as Orange Shirt Day, on September 30.

And to the east, a First Nations community in New Brunswick contacted her about sales in their gift shop.

Further growth and expansion depends on locating a permanent production space rather than the continued use of certified leased kitchens. Maki needs a cool place without humidity and is currently investigating the sites. She said that education, survival and her legacy depended on it.

If you want to order Raven Rising chocolate or pastry, or join its local Ajijaak Chocolate monthly membership club, visit RavenRising.ca. Maki products can now also be purchased on the Ontario Legislature Gift Shop website.

Anastasia Rioux is a freelance writer in Greater Sudbury.

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Alebrijes display celebrates day of the dead, Oaxacan culture in New York https://cacaovm.org/alebrijes-display-celebrates-day-of-the-dead-oaxacan-culture-in-new-york/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/alebrijes-display-celebrates-day-of-the-dead-oaxacan-culture-in-new-york/ Two large Mexican folk art sculptures known as alebrijes were installed in New York as part of a 12-day celebration of Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) and a month-long promotion from Oaxaca to the United States. A dragon and a feathered jaguar, respectively over three and four meters tall, currently adorn the central […]]]>

Two large Mexican folk art sculptures known as alebrijes were installed in New York as part of a 12-day celebration of Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) and a month-long promotion from Oaxaca to the United States.

A dragon and a feathered jaguar, respectively over three and four meters tall, currently adorn the central plaza of Rockefeller Center in midtown Manhattan.

Made by Oaxacan artisans Jacobo and María Angeles, the colorful and fantastical sculptures are a major highlight of “Mexico Week: Día de Muertos at Rockefeller Center”, a free event that started last Friday and will run until November 2.

Of them catrinas, female skeletons commonly associated with the Day of the Dead, are also on display in the famous New York landmark. The statue of the Greek titan Atlas in the central plaza will be converted into a flower installation later this week, and a day of the dead ofrenda, or altar, honoring the victims of COVID-19 will be set up.

In addition, an open-air market, or tianguis, the sale of Mexican crafts, food and drink will take place from Friday to next Wednesday.

The Governor of Oaxaca, Alejandro Murat, was in New York last Friday to attend the inauguration of the Day of the Dead festival and to launch the “Month of Oaxaca in the United States”, an event which celebrates the art, the culture and traditions of the southern state.

“… Oaxaca has a goal that we like to sum up in one sentence: we want more Oaxaca in the world and more people in Oaxaca. Being here at Rockefeller Center in New York unveiling these alebrijes and by starting this festival of economic and cultural promotion, we know that we are achieving this goal, ”he said.

“In Oaxaca, everything is done with the soul because, with us, the spirits dance, paint, cook and write”, declared the governor.

Mexican Ambassador to the United States Esteban Moctezuma spoke about Oaxaca’s great natural and cultural beauty, while Rockefeller Center CEO EB Kelly thanked the government of Oaxaca and the Mexican Consulate in New York for making the Day of the Dead event possible.

With reports of El Economista and Hyperallergic

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5 Portland roasters who weave coffee identity, culture and history https://cacaovm.org/5-portland-roasters-who-weave-coffee-identity-culture-and-history/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/5-portland-roasters-who-weave-coffee-identity-culture-and-history/ While most of us stare at our morning cup of coffee and think about a fresh start, roasters see the conclusion of a long journey that began on a farm thousands of miles away. For some roasters, this journey is more intimate and personal. Whether it’s sharing a part of their home serving coffee grown […]]]>

While most of us stare at our morning cup of coffee and think about a fresh start, roasters see the conclusion of a long journey that began on a farm thousands of miles away. For some roasters, this journey is more intimate and personal. Whether it’s sharing a part of their home serving coffee grown on a family farm or debunking misconceptions about their area’s coffee, these Portland roasters show how sourcing coffee from their roots can stimulate conversations and build community.

Portland Ca Phê

In the specialty coffee industry, beans from Africa and South America are considered the best. But Vietnamese coffee? Not really. No surprise to Kim Dam, who in more than five years as a barista and cafe manager, had never worked at a place selling specialty Vietnam coffee. Daughter of Vietnamese immigrants, Dam had other ideas. When the pandemic gave her time to dive back into coffee and learn roasting, she started at her mother’s House of Banh Mi sandwich shop and connected with coffee farms in Vietnam. After tapping into her roasting skills, she opened Cà Phê in April, featuring three different roasts from Vietnam, as well as the pork banh mi with tofu and lemongrass from her family’s shop. The house blend is half Arabica, the most cultivated and popular species of coffee in premium coffee in the United States, while half is Robusta, which dominates Vietnamese coffee production but is often considered less desirable in the US market. The fruity arabica is balanced by the earthy robusta, says Dam.

PHILOSOPHY: “Coffee has to be how you want to drink it. There is no right way to drink it; there is no wrong way to drink it.

WHAT TO ORDER: Ube Latte (homemade purple yam syrup with espresso and milk)

WHICH BEANS TO TRY: House blend (50% Robusta 50% Arabica)

Super Joy Coffee

Originally from Hefei, China, Joe Yang’s love of coffee took him across the world to Portland, propelled by the dream of opening his own cafe in the United States. He also wanted to introduce Chinese coffee beans to the palates of West Coast aficionados. At Super Joy, the 2020 American Coffee Championships roast winner imports a limited amount of beans from China’s Yunnan region which he roasts alongside coffee from more traditional regions like Colombia, Ethiopia and Nicaragua.

PHILOSOPHY: “To share the joy with our coffee.

WHAT TO ORDER: Cortado or 8oz Latte (so customers can taste the quality of the espresso)

WHICH BEANS TO TRY: Yunnan (complex blend of wine, blueberry and chocolate notes)

Abondance Coffee

When Faisal Mutua was growing up in Kenya, he would roam his grandfather’s coffee farm in search of ripe coffee cherries ready to harvest or branches to prune. Fast forward to a move to Portland to study nursing, where his love of coffee followed him. So in 2015, the part-time nurse and third-generation coffee grower created Abundancia to roast and sell his family’s coffee here in the United States, winning several awards for his coffee, such as a delicate medium roast with sweet notes of blackberry while insisting on a middle class salary for its coffee farmers in Kenya. Grab a cup with Wagyu Beef or Impossible Dumplings or freshly baked raspberry scones at Momo Master, a Nepalese food cart that Mutua opened with a friend in the spring of 2021.

PHILOSOPHY: “Simplicity is elegant. “

WHAT TO ORDER: Pour over

WHICH BEANS TO TRY: Kenya Great Reserve

Cafe Zamora

Hector Mejia Zamora doesn’t see coffee as just a drink to wake up lazy people – for him, it’s a tool that has the potential to make his home a better place. Growing up on his family’s coffee farm in Guatemala, he saw the many ways small coffee farmers were underpaid for their work. When he moved to Portland, Zamora held several entry-level jobs while learning English. But it was while working as a Lyft driver that he met two passengers who helped him fulfill his dream of importing coffee straight from the family farm to serve it in the United States: a roaster who helped him. to import its first batch of green beans and a retail space owner. who told her about an available place that has become the welcoming and warm Café Zamora, complete with a backyard, community events, occasional live music, and heartwarming loroco-stuffed Guatemalan tamales made by Zamora’s mother.

PHILOSOPHY: “Coffee is a platform to be able to accomplish something bigger. “

WHAT TO ORDER: Pour over

WHICH BEANS TO TRY: Medium mix (soft, crunchy, chocolatey)

Reforma coffee roasters

Coffee, for Angel Medina, is about history and connection. Prior to founding Reforma Roasters, he spent a year traveling across Mexico to nurture relationships with coffee growers and deepen his understanding of coffee production. Reforma now sources beans exclusively from Mexico, working with farmers Medina knows personally and with trusted coffee importers. Find all of their beautifully packaged beans at La Perlita, the bustling Pearl Quarter cafe with brick walls and high ceilings in the Medina, and in the morning grab some pan dulce for soaking at your cafe in the nearby República restaurant.

PHILOSOPHY: “Understand the culture and buy from people you trust. “

WHAT TO ORDER: The real Mexican mocha (espresso, chocolate, milk and spices sprinkled with freeze-dried raspberry powder and crushed cocoa beans)

WHICH BEANS TO TRY: »Tell us what you like and we’ll point you in the right direction.

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Summary of the event | Barrel Culture Invitational – PorchDrinking.com https://cacaovm.org/summary-of-the-event-barrel-culture-invitational-porchdrinking-com/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/summary-of-the-event-barrel-culture-invitational-porchdrinking-com/ Brewing and mixing in barrels hosted its annual Invitational this weekend on Saturday, October 16 at its valve room in Durham, North Carolina. The festival featured 35 breweries and over 80 beers, including special bottles and magnum pours. DDH Ghost in the Machine Parish Barrel Culture Invitational 2021 The Invitational brought breweries from across the […]]]>

Brewing and mixing in barrels hosted its annual Invitational this weekend on Saturday, October 16 at its valve room in Durham, North Carolina. The festival featured 35 breweries and over 80 beers, including special bottles and magnum pours.

DDH Ghost in the Machine Parish
DDH Ghost in the Machine Parish

Barrel Culture Invitational 2021

The Invitational brought breweries from across the country together for a day full of fantastic beers and fun times for all. They also had food trucks on site including a vegan option, taco option, pizza option, and barbecue option.

Overall the event went smoothly with various areas inside and out for sipping beers and relaxing. Barrel Culture did a great job selling the right amount of tickets to avoid any excessively long lines or overly crowded spaces. Even a little rain in the afternoon could not dampen the spirits of all who were delighted to be present after a pandemic-induced disruption last year.

Burley Oak Jream
Burley Oak Jream

Best beers

Here are some highlights from the Barrel Culture Invitational, listed in alphabetical order:

  • Burley Oak Double Raspberry, Orange, Marshmallow Pie ​​Jream: Imperial Sour Ale with lactose packed on orange, raspberry, cinnamon, vanilla, brown sugar and nutmeg.
  • Maple wood Coconut with peanut butter and barrel-aged cuppa 2020: Imperial Stout. This variant is blended from Cuppa aged in Buffalo Trace, Heaven Hill and Weller barrels for 12 to 18 months. Packaged on cocoa beans, vanilla, coffee, toasted coconut and peanut butter.
  • North park Supreme Brunch with Thai Pecans and Bananas Aged in Maple Barrels Before Dying: Imperial Stout.
  • Parish Double phantom dry hopped in the machine: Imperial IPA with Citra hops. Parish also brought in bottles of Decade One, an Imperial Bourbon Cask Aged Stout that was spectacular.
  • Phase three Eunoia Lot 6: Imperial stout aged in barrel with Tugboat coffee, maple syrup and cocoa nibs from Ghana.
  • RaR Out of Order Runnin ‘Splash Punch: Fruity Sour with Rainbow, Orange, Raspberry & Lime Double Sorbet
Mortalis Magnum For
Mortalis Imperial Stout Magnum For

We look forward to Barrel Culture’s 2022 invitation and to see which breweries from across the country will be in attendance!


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