Cacao culture – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 01:21:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cacaovm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-150x150.png Cacao culture – Cacao VM http://cacaovm.org/ 32 32 London filled with culture in Shoreditch and Brixton https://cacaovm.org/london-filled-with-culture-in-shoreditch-and-brixton/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 19:17:26 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/london-filled-with-culture-in-shoreditch-and-brixton/ Caribbean food. A Nigerian dance party. Art exhibitions presenting hard truths about a colonial legacy. This is the London I love, the one I had the chance to rediscover during a recent trip following a long pandemic break. With a favorable exchange rate between the pound and the US dollar and more eyes on London […]]]>

Caribbean food. A Nigerian dance party. Art exhibitions presenting hard truths about a colonial legacy. This is the London I love, the one I had the chance to rediscover during a recent trip following a long pandemic break.

With a favorable exchange rate between the pound and the US dollar and more eyes on London as it celebrates its ranking as best city in the world– it’s the perfect time to go back to the other side of the pond. Consider, however, stepping outside the tourist spots and diving deep into two culturally rich areas: Brixton and Shoreditch.

Over the years I’ve spent hours on the crowded street corners of Brixton after the Notting Hill Carnival, latching onto the last sounds of reggae and soca before night turned to day. I had meetings over tea or the latest museum exhibition in the always trendy Shoreditch. Both have a hodgepodge of people and food, as well as a palpable energy that is addictive.

This is how I spent my time in London:

A perfect few days in Shoreditch

Book now: Hundred Shoreditch

Newly opened One Hundred Shoreditch is already a hotel where the cool kids congregate to work and be seen, to drink floral cocktails and panoramic views at Rooftop bar Where Seed Library— a den of fluffy cocktails in the basement. The dimly lit lobby, lined with wooden tables and communal seating, nods to its past as the Ace Hotel, though this 258-room property is distinctly its own thing. My room – designed in a minimalist style with wooden accents and natural light – faced Shoreditch High Street, a trendy East London thoroughfare featuring art galleries, vintage clothing shops, vegan pizza and oat milk lattes.

One Hundred Shoreditch replaced the Ace Hotel in 2022; it remains a popular Shoreditch meeting place for locals and visitors alike.

Courtesy of Cent Shoreditch

My days in Shoreditch included a stop at Columbia Road Flower Market to admire bouquets of blooming daffodils, tulips and bluebells. A tart cupcake with ripe apples and a cup of mint tea from the neighbor Lily Vanilla Bakery served as fuel before my visit to Autograph, a photo gallery designed by Sir David Adjaye. The British-Ghanaian architect is known for his work on the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC; unsurprisingly, this gallery features images and films on the theme of inclusivity and social justice. by Sasha Huber you name it exhibition – which explores who and what we commemorate – is currently running until March 2023.

I looked at the series of photos by artist Mónica de Miranda entitled The Island, which ran until October 22 and explored the complex relationship between the African diaspora and Europe’s colonial past. In the evening, reunion with a dear friend over salted oysters and fried rice with crab at the always crowded restaurant smoking goat nearby was a rewarding finale to a day of exploring.

The next evening, I made my way through a crowded dance floor at External network to celebrate Nigeria’s independence from British rule 62 years ago – a complicated reality that I do not lose sight of. Yet we danced – energetically and in unison on every lyric – as the room overflowed with shiny black bodies like mine who always used movement as both a means of challenge and joy.

The next day I checked in Shipping containers in the South Shore area. Offering a stark difference from the frenetic energy of the city of Shoreditch, the 359-room property sits in a tranquil corner by the Thames, with a maritime theme to match the waters just outside. A copper hull lines the reception area, and the upper deck of the hotel contains a rooftop bar, The Knot, with panoramic views.

The spacious balcony of my riverside suite lent itself to glistening views of the city in the distance. A visit to his appeasement Aqua-Spa was the pick-me-up needed after all the walking through Shoreditch. In the evening on the ground floor, a white cocoa and passion fruit cocktail at the Lyaness bar relieved me until bedtime before another day of exploring.

Book now: Shipping containers

Sea Containers Hotel exterior (left);  bar interior

London’s Sea Containers overlooks the River Thames; The Lyaness Hotel Bar was designed by the best bartender in the world, Mr. Lyan.

Photo by Niall Cultton (left) and courtesy of Sea Containers (right)

A perfect day in Brixton

It has been about five years since I last visited Brixton, which is about 20 minutes from Sea Containers via the tube. A colleague and content creatorEulanda Osagiede, gave me some tips for making the most of my day in a neighborhood she’s lived close to for 10 years and calls the heart of London, even though a lot is changing.

“As more money has flowed into Brixton and the commercial property market has boomed, many local businesses that have been based in Brixton for 30 years or more have been forced to relocate due to increased tenancies” , she told me. “The loss of local businesses (often owned by BIPOC) can sometimes make Brixton feel commercialized. However, a brief stroll through the neighborhood will make it clear to you that Brixton’s multicultural influence is inseparable. This intact multiculturalism is exactly what I sought to find among the streets that hold the energy, traditions and flavor of the black diaspora.

I started to Black Cultural Archivea building that retains materials that celebrate the history of African and Caribbean people in the UK. Transforming Legacies is an ongoing exhibition until January 2023 that brings together 21 emerging and established artists to showcase 40 years of black British art across multiple disciplines including painting, ceramics, film and performance.

For lunch, I headed to Fish, Wings & Tings, a Caribbean restaurant serving cod fritters with a creamy ginger-lime sauce, goat curry and, of course, a mighty rum punch. It’s a perfect spot to sit on the outdoor patio and people watch as the reggae blares from the speakers. For other food choices in Brixton, Eulanda recommended a family-run Thai restaurant Kaosarnespecially for his gaeng kua sapparod goong, a red curry cooked in coconut milk with fresh pineapple, tomatoes, kaffir lime leaves, fresh chilli and basil that can be topped with duck, tofu, vegetables or prawns. For a lively brunch, provincial serves generous portions of Afro-Latin dishes that include Peruvian wok fried rice seasoned with ginger and a fried seafood platter with cassava chips.

On my next visit to London I plan to visit Super cute, a Dominican bar and Afro-Latinx dance hall in Brixton Village Market. So far, time has passed and so has my energy level, a testament to a very rewarding route and a brief return to London.

Getting There :
Virgin Atlantic offers daily nonstop flights from LAX, Boston Logan International Airport and JFK to London-Heathrow. During this trip, I got a taste of his Jetson-esque Higher class cabin, complete with a lounge area for a drink and a book to pass the time.

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Nature, Culture and Gastronomy Tours in Ecuador https://cacaovm.org/nature-culture-and-gastronomy-tours-in-ecuador/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 12:08:36 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/nature-culture-and-gastronomy-tours-in-ecuador/ “Ecuador has given priority to the American market. This is the first market from which they receive tourists. Although with the pandemic the numbers have dropped, there has always been an influx of Americans,” says Ana Ontaneda, director of promotions and marketing for the ministry. tourism from Ecuador to TravelPulse. The interviewee mentions that tourists […]]]>

“Ecuador has given priority to the American market. This is the first market from which they receive tourists. Although with the pandemic the numbers have dropped, there has always been an influx of Americans,” says Ana Ontaneda, director of promotions and marketing for the ministry. tourism from Ecuador to TravelPulse.

The interviewee mentions that tourists who visit Ecuador are looking for adventure tourism, the Amazon and the Galapagos, the jewel in the crown. A point in favor of the destination is that the country can be traveled quickly, in a few hours, due to its size. “In 4 hours, the tourist is on the beach, and he can go to the Amazon in two hours. Domestic flights are short (the longest is 45 minutes). It is easy to get around, and it does not take long to get to know Ecuador. After the pandemic, outdoor tourism opened up,” says Ontadena.

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Four days in Quito and Guayaquil

Both cities have international airports. From Quito there is a great cultural offer, especially the Centro Histórico, an ancient site. There is also the city Mitad del Mundo. And 1h30. away are the tropical forests, or you can head to La Coca, the part of the Amazon (30 min. by plane; 4 hours by car).

Although most tourists only come to Coca as a port of embarkation to Amazonian lodges in Yasuni National Park, Huaorani Reserve, Limoncocha Biological Reserve and Cuyabeno Reserve, the town can be said to have a quite impressive tourist infrastructure.

Coca is not a place where visitors spend much time, but despite this, there are hotels, restaurants, bars and nightclubs. It is an exclusive venue and is run by the local community. There is a lot of cultural tourism in Cuenca, and in Baños, 2 hours from Quito, there is adventure tourism. From Quito there is adventure and sports tourism.

In terms of gastronomy, each province has its own increasingly well-known typical dishes: roasted cuy (hamster), pork (hornado, frittata), or even cocoa, very popular in Ecuador. Paccari is the company that put Ecuadorian cocoa in the mouths of the world.

The route of the sun in Guayaquil offers beautiful beaches, where the food offered is also delicious and considered one of the best. The climate is very mild and the water is not cold. The distance from Quito to the nearest beach is 4 hours. For those traveling by road, the hotel’s infrastructure and offerings are impeccable. “Ecuador is a country for families. There are activities and destinations for everyone. The Galapagos Islands are different. The rest of Ecuador is suitable for children, babies and even senior tourism. many American retirees live in Cuenca,” the audience says. official.


Mitad del Mundo has cultural, tourist, commercial and scientific offers. Its architecture corresponds to the colonial style.

The museum infrastructure of both cities is important. The historic center of Quito was founded in 1534. There is the Church of the Company, which has gold leaf. You can climb the domes and enjoy the city. There are many museums. The Chapel of the Burning Man, with a museum of all his works, is an emblematic building for its architecture, and the pictorial and mural work was inaugurated on November 29, 2002. It is part of the Guayasamin Foundation cultural complex, located in Bellavista-Quito, which currently has: The Chapel of Man, the Guayasamin House-Museum -the residence where the Master lived his last years-; and the archaeological site, with 13 pre-Hispanic tombs discovered.

The Carondelet Palace is the seat of government and the official residence of the President of the Republic of Ecuador. It is located in the historic center of the capital Quito. It is one of the main symbols of the Ecuadorian State and the nerve center of the public space known as Plaza de la Independencia or Plaza Grande (viceregal name).

Mitad del Mundo has cultural, tourist, commercial and scientific offers. Its architecture corresponds to the colonial style. It has multiple and varied commercial establishments where it is possible to find crafts from all over the territory and gastronomy for all tastes, national and international, traditional or gourmet. The history of this city is associated with the geodetic mission that arrived in Ecuador in 1736 to take part in the measurement of a quadrant of the meridian arc in order to verify the shape of the earth.

Mitad del Mundo is a well-known place where many people go to have their picture taken, walking with each foot on a different hemisphere. There are boutique hotels, which have recently become a popular destination for weddings.


Galápagos Land & Sea — Central and Eastern Islands aboard the Monserrat
The emblematic animal is the tortoise, the George, of gigantic proportions, or the blue-footed boobies.

Seven days in the Galapagos Islands

To get there, you have to fly from Quito or Guayaquil. There are two entrances, San Cristobal and Baltra. The site is very accessible and there are several days left to visit at least four islands, such as Isabela, among others. The emblematic animal is the tortoise, the George, of gigantic proportions, or the blue-footed boobies. The flora and fauna of the site contribute to the tourist attraction.

“People who come to this site fall in love with the environment and its inhabitants. The site can be visited anytime, in December, January and February – the austral summer – it is hot and humid, no more than 35 “C, but it’s windy. When it’s cold, in June, July and August, it’s cold. The visit is not cheap because the authorities do not want mass tourism in the region”, explains Ana Ontadena from the Ecuadorian Ministry of Tourism.

The hotel infrastructure of the Galapagos Islands is vast and diverse. The inhabitants of the islands are responsible for giving tours and explanations; they are professionally trained to do so. There are requirements to enter the islands, such as a non-COVID-19 certificate. Take care of animals and do not throw them away. The Galápagos Islands are a magical place.

The Charles Darwin Foundation continues to work and is in close contact with local universities to prepare students for the care and preservation of flora and fauna. Some famous historical visits to the islands include Queen Isabella among others.

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AlUla combines heritage and creativity, says RCU representative at Culture Summit Abu Dhabi https://cacaovm.org/alula-combines-heritage-and-creativity-says-rcu-representative-at-culture-summit-abu-dhabi/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 12:26:16 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/alula-combines-heritage-and-creativity-says-rcu-representative-at-culture-summit-abu-dhabi/ DUBAI: As an equally accomplished writer and painter in both disciplines, Kahlil Gibran is undoubtedly one of the Middle East’s greatest cultural exports. The Lebanese-American artist, author, and philosopher is best known for his 1923 book of prose poetry “The Prophet.” And while his work in English proved popular among the masses, critical response at […]]]>

DUBAI: As an equally accomplished writer and painter in both disciplines, Kahlil Gibran is undoubtedly one of the Middle East’s greatest cultural exports. The Lebanese-American artist, author, and philosopher is best known for his 1923 book of prose poetry “The Prophet.” And while his work in English proved popular among the masses, critical response at the time was less forgiving, perhaps because many of those critics did not yet have the tools to judge a writer fairly. with strong oriental influences.

Nearly a century after “The Prophet” was published, however, Gibran’s popularity continues to soar from generation to generation.

“Gibran was the voice of the East that finally reached the West and found that the West was thirsty for spirituality,” Arab News told Arab News. “Just take a look at the period he was there. There were many great thinkers, poets, writers and artists and they all congregated in New York. So it was a great melting pot and Gibran had his finger on the pulse. He knew something big was going to happen; there was this industrialized nation that was being born and all these new technologies that were coming out, there were such great innovations and thinking. So I think Gibran was kind of saying, “All of this great technology is going to help people. I’m going to write a book that also helps people. And he did it using his voice from the Orient which was Arabic in thought and process because he was part of this incredible history of a region that goes back eons. He was aware of this and he was in tune with it, whether it was the “epic of Gilgamesh” to the Bible and the Koran. It all happened in his garden.

Gibran was born in 1883 in the village of Bsharri near Mount Lebanon to Khalil Sa’ad Gibran and Kamila Rahmeh, both Maronite Christians. While his mother encouraged his sensitive and artistic nature (she gave him a book containing works of art by Michelangelo, which stimulated in him a lifelong love for the artist and art in general ), his father was a more sporadic presence.

After years of poverty and uncertainty, Kamila packed up her four children and moved to Boston to live with her family, leaving Gibran’s father behind in Lebanon. Kamila and the children settled in Boston’s Southside, at the time the second largest Syrian-Lebanese-American community in the United States.
Gibran, almost a teenager at the time, went to Josiah Quincy School, where teachers quickly noticed his artistic abilities and he was soon enrolled in the nearby art school, Denison House, where he was introduced to Bostonian avant-garde artist F. Holland Day.

Gibran thrived. He quickly immersed himself in the works of Shakespeare, William Blake, WB Yeats and TS Eliot. “He was looking to make his mark. He was someone who lived a very sheltered life. Bcharré was so far away, even from Beirut. So imagine, you know, over 100 years ago, there wasn’t much (out there) that you could read, was there? I’m sure it was very limited. Thus, one of the first hard-hitting books he read was “Thus Spake Zarathustra” by Nietzsche. He was also inspired by the music of Wagner. His first published book was a Wagner-inspired treatise on Arabic music,” says Kalem-Habib.

Gibran was also heavily influenced by Arabic literature and art, including ‘Arabian Nights’ and the ancient epic ‘Layla and Majnun’.

“He kind of merged all of those influences into (something) that no one had ever done before. And he was really, really successful,” Kalem-Habib says.

An image from the 2014 animated film “The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran”. (GKIDS)

Gibran continues to find new audiences. In 2014, Mexican actress Salma Hayek – whose father is of Lebanese descent – ​​produced an animated film adapting Gibran’s work, titled “Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet”.

While Hayek’s first exposure to Gibran was through her late Lebanese grandfather, she rediscovered the book years later as a student, an experience she told Entertainment Weekly “was very meaningful to me, because I felt like my grandfather was even teaching me about life even though he was gone.

Speaking about the film, Hayek said, “I think it’s important for people to remember that there was an Arab-American writer who wrote a book that touched so many people. It has sold over 120 million copies worldwide and has influenced the lives of people of all religions and beliefs, ages, colors and backgrounds. And I think it’s relevant today. I also think it’s important that we are exposed to material that reminds us of the beauty of our humanity.

A less publicized but equally important adaptation came in the form of the musical “Broken Wings,” adapted from Gibran’s 1912 autobiographical novel.

Written by Lebanese-English West End star Nadim Naaman and Qatari composer Dana Al-Fardan, the musical is a love letter to Gibran and the Middle East.

“Dana and I were introduced by mutual friends in 2016. She was in London for her own gig and I was performing in ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ at the time. We found out we both wanted to write a a musical of Middle Eastern heritage that would positively illuminate the region. Kahlil Gibran immediately established himself as an iconic Middle Eastern figure who transcended borders and is revered in the Middle East, Europe and America,” says Naaman “It became a perfect goal for us: to pay homage to him and to Lebanon, but also to introduce him to a wider audience and celebrate his contribution to the literary world.

“Gibran has always resonated strongly with me. Her books were scattered around my family home as a child, her words recited at weddings, funerals and graduations. Moreover, as a man of Lebanese descent who has spent his life in the West, I am strongly attached to the fact that Gibran, and many other Lebanese, have spent more of their lives outside the country than in inside. As an actor, musician and writer trying to represent Lebanon internationally, there is no better role model than Gibran,” he adds.

Since its first publication, “The Prophet” has never been out of print. It has been translated into over 100 languages, making it one of the 10 most translated books in history. Its popularity soared in the 1960s, when the American counterculture was booming, and later among New Age movements.

To celebrate the centennial of the book next year, the Kalem-Habib collective is hosting several events across the United States and possibly the Middle East and will unveil a new monument in New York, a city where Gibran spent a considerable time and where he breathed his last. in 1931, aged 48.

“Gibran was so ahead of his time. It represents many philosophical and moral ideas that the world continues to move toward in 2022,” Naaman says. “Here is a Middle Eastern immigrant who has found a new home in the West and was writing a century ago about gender equality and women’s rights, about harmony and tolerance between religions and nationalities, about the corruption of politicians and the mistreatment of the working classes, about the possibility of building a new home and finding a sense of belonging if one has to leave one’s own place of birth. Essentially, all of this remains mainstream narratives in the global media. »

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High Culture: Does Eminem smoke weed? https://cacaovm.org/high-culture-does-eminem-smoke-weed/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/high-culture-does-eminem-smoke-weed/ Something he talked about is his past struggles with prescription drug addiction. He has opened up in interviews that once his career started to take off and he was living in the fast lane, he would often take sleeping pills to calm him down. This period of his life was followed by a four-year hiatus […]]]>

Something he talked about is his past struggles with prescription drug addiction. He has opened up in interviews that once his career started to take off and he was living in the fast lane, he would often take sleeping pills to calm him down.

This period of his life was followed by a four-year hiatus from music, where he spent his time in rehab and then relapsed. The release of his album Recovery marks a turning point in his life and career.

Eminem aside, it’s common for ex-addicts to turn to cannabis for a more natural and less addictive form of relief.

But, like everyone struggles with addiction, it’s personal. We shouldn’t make any assumptions about how the rapper coped with addiction or if he uses cannabis to combat these issues.

Mind you, Eminem has a few other songs that pay homage to cannabis, like Must be the ganja. And then there are songs like The The Adventures of Moon Man and Slim Shadywith Kid Cudi, where Eminem raps, “I had hoop dreams, now I shoot three / Got some green, but I don’t do weed.”

These are just songs, of course. Ultimately, it’s unclear if Eminem uses cannabis or not. But one thing is for sure: he seems to be in the happiest and healthiest state of his career, so kudos to the rap god for that.

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In the southern Philippines, a special ‘black stew’ offers a taste of local Muslim culture https://cacaovm.org/in-the-southern-philippines-a-special-black-stew-offers-a-taste-of-local-muslim-culture/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 19:46:28 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/in-the-southern-philippines-a-special-black-stew-offers-a-taste-of-local-muslim-culture/ Recipes for success: Chef Kelvin Cheung shares tips, recipe for Indian rice and lentil dish TORONTO: Chinese-Canadian chef Kelvin Cheung’s culinary journey began at the age of 12, while working at his father’s restaurant in Chicago. He’s come a long way since then, with stints in Toronto, Vancouver, Delhi, Mumbai and now Dubai. While in […]]]>

Recipes for success: Chef Kelvin Cheung shares tips, recipe for Indian rice and lentil dish

TORONTO: Chinese-Canadian chef Kelvin Cheung’s culinary journey began at the age of 12, while working at his father’s restaurant in Chicago. He’s come a long way since then, with stints in Toronto, Vancouver, Delhi, Mumbai and now Dubai.

While in India, Cheung was a favorite of several Bollywood celebrities, and he is becoming something of a celebrity himself, thanks to social media. His latest venture — Jun’s — is already making waves on the Dubai culinary scene with its “elevated North American and Asian dining experience.”

If you’re not sure what that means, consider tempura za’atar chaat – a surprising mix of za’atar, tempura, tamarind, yogurt and chaat masala or lamb koobideh, which includes traditional bindings of the koobideh, as well as the nikiri and the egg. egg yolk sauce, with kimchi jam.

His latest venture — Jun’s — is already making waves on the Dubai culinary scene with its “elevated North American and Asian dining experience.” (Provided)

Cheung says Jun’s is rooted in his Chinese heritage, North American upbringing and French culinary training. And he emphasizes that he tries to source the freshest ingredients from local farms.

Here, Cheung talks about discipline, noodles and learning leadership, and reveals his “perfect Sunday brunch recipe.”

Q. What is your best advice for home cooks?
A. Cooking is a difficult skill that you never really master, but discipline is key. Expect to be a lifelong student.

Q. What is an ingredient that can instantly improve any dish?
A. Salt. You need to add salt to enhance and flavor the rest of the ingredients, as well as to balance the dish, especially the desserts. Many inexperienced chefs struggle with (getting the right amount of salt). It takes experience, muscle memory and confidence.

Jun’s Wagyu Burger. (Provided)

Q. What is your favorite cuisine to eat?
A. Japanese. Especially the sushi.

Q. When you go out to eat, do you ever criticize the food?
A. Never criticize, always observe… I like to hear the story of what inspired a dish or how it came about. Entering the mind of a chef is always so interesting for me.

Q. What is your favorite dish to cook?
A. I love making noodles. My wife and son are obsessed with noodles, and I make them a bowl from scratch. I take a whole chicken and beef bones to make a super rich and potent bone broth. It’s nutritionally dense, hearty and delicious. Cook the noodles, prepare the toppings and sauces, and serve my loved ones a hot, steaming bowl of delicious noodle soup. It fills my heart.

Q. If you have to cook something quickly, what is your favorite dish?
A. Eggs. They are essential to us. They are healthy, convenient, accessible, affordable and something we all love.

Q. What is the most difficult dish on your menu?
A. Jun’s burger. It’s simple and no frills, but you have to be precise every time. We weigh the exact ratio between pancake and bun. We use four cuts of wagyu beef, which are then diced by hand to make the patty. The execution must be perfect. We cook the patties until the edges are crispy, while making sure the burger stays juicy.

Rainbow heirloom carrots on labneh. (Provided)

Q. Are you a strict boss?
A. My leadership style has changed dramatically over the years. I was trained in Chinese and French kitchens where there were high expectations and no room for error. So it took me a while to practice being a less reactive leader. Becoming a father and reading about parenting styles was a big catalyst for profound change.
Although I steer a very tight ship in terms of organization and performance, I believe in teaching and modeling, rather than barking orders. I’m very proud to say that some of my team members have been with me for almost a decade now, moving cities and countries to continue on my team.

Chef Kelvin’s Pumpkin Congee

For: 2-4

INGREDIENTS:
1 kg fresh pumpkin – seeded, peeled and diced
8 cups water or vegetable broth
1 button ginger, peeled and sliced
¾ cup sweet jasmine rice, well rinsed
Salt, white pepper and light soy sauce for seasoning
1 cup pumpkin seeds, toasted
½ cup chili oil (for garnish)
½ cup green onions, chopped
¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS:

In a saucepan, bring the water or vegetable broth to a boil. Add pumpkin and ginger; simmer until pumpkin is tender.

Remove half of the pumpkin. Crush or puree and set aside.

In the same pot, add the rice and simmer until cooked through. Now add the pumpkin puree.

Season with salt, white pepper and light soy sauce. Mix well.

Garnish with roasted pumpkin seeds, chili oil, green onions and green cilantro. Serve.

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Experience indigenous culture on a superyacht cruise along Ecuador’s less-visited mainland coast with Kontiki Expeditions https://cacaovm.org/experience-indigenous-culture-on-a-superyacht-cruise-along-ecuadors-less-visited-mainland-coast-with-kontiki-expeditions/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 21:25:16 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/experience-indigenous-culture-on-a-superyacht-cruise-along-ecuadors-less-visited-mainland-coast-with-kontiki-expeditions/ We crossed the Buenavista River and followed a dirt road through ceibo and carob trees, past bulbous termite nests and women beating laundry against rocks, until we emerged into a clearing under a twisted ficus tree. . The shaman Plinio Merchán was waiting for us. Her body was painted in red roucou ink and a […]]]>

We crossed the Buenavista River and followed a dirt road through ceibo and carob trees, past bulbous termite nests and women beating laundry against rocks, until we emerged into a clearing under a twisted ficus tree. . The shaman Plinio Merchán was waiting for us. Her body was painted in red roucou ink and a precious ceramic necklace, generations old, hung over her heart.

Merchán is the leader of Agua Blanca, an indigenous community descended from the Manteño, one of the oldest civilizations in South America. For 1500 years, ancestral knowledge has been passed down from father to son. But today, for the very first time, Merchán invited strangers to join him in a ritual prayer.

A trail of sawdust forms sinuous lines in the earth, and it is along this path that we walk barefoot. A pyre burns in the center of the circle and the air is scented with smoking palo santo. Merchán tells us to make a wish before calling down solstices and directional winds, blessing families and nations near and far, and ending the ceremony with the mournful whimper of a conch shell. This was not how I imagined life on a superyacht. It’s better.

The Shining, 128 feet M/Y Kontiki Wayra features nine cabins, a spa, jacuzzi, wine cellar and a deck to sip freshly chopped coconut juice. The trip I took part in begins and ends in Manta, a busy fishing port in the central province of Manabí in Ecuador. The flora and fauna of this region are not unlike what you will find in Galapagos. The big difference: no tourist ships.

Kontiki Wayra’s indoor living room

Kontiki Expeditions

Artisanal chocolate production in San Miguel de Sarampión

Kontiki Expeditions

Carlos Nuñez, whose family made a fortune in tuna fishing, started Kontiki Expeditions because he wanted to bring sustainable tourism to the little-visited coast of mainland Ecuador. By focusing on luxury yacht excursions, Nuñez is reducing his environmental footprint while creating jobs and supporting communities still recovering from the devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake of 2016. His idea was so novel that Nuñez had to offer 20-30% higher salaries to convince the deck crew to bet on their vision.

Every stop on my route serves this greater mission. When our plancha arrived at Gray Bay in Isla de la Plata, we were the only ones there. The island is part of Machalilla National Park, the largest in Ecuador. It is nicknamed “Little Galapagos”, or, more ironically, “Galapagos of the poor”, which drives guide Raul “Ruly” Menoscal crazy. “This place deserves respect,” grumbles the retired shortstop-turned-avid naturalist, noting that while there is some overlap in wildlife between the famous volcanic archipelago and here, it’s one of finest seabird reserves in the world. “It just suffers from lousy marketing.”

Isla de la Plata has a cap of 200 visitors per day in peak season, but Nuñez pulled enough strings to ensure we had the place mostly to ourselves. Park ranger Sandra Plua led us on a three-mile hike through seabird nesting sites, pointing out medicinal plants along the way: sticky berries, or muyuyo, are a natural laxative and screen solar; mimosa albida, recognizable by its frilly fuschia pompoms, is boiled for tea and used to treat menstrual cramps. Nazca boobies with orange traffic cone beaks staggered along jagged cliffs and magnificent frigates flew overhead, but I was particularly obsessed with an abandoned blue-footed booby who gazed longingly at the lady he had lost. and her new suitor.

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Food for thought with Kat | Milk masquerades | arts and culture https://cacaovm.org/food-for-thought-with-kat-milk-masquerades-arts-and-culture/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 19:08:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/food-for-thought-with-kat-milk-masquerades-arts-and-culture/ Every time we turn around, a new food is milked. From nuts and seeds to grains and legumes, you name it, it probably comes in “processed” form. Even Cuban cafes in Key West, where I vacationed last week, now offer almond milk, a sellout I hadn’t expected in the southernmost city. Lactose intolerance and dairy […]]]>

Every time we turn around, a new food is milked. From nuts and seeds to grains and legumes, you name it, it probably comes in “processed” form. Even Cuban cafes in Key West, where I vacationed last week, now offer almond milk, a sellout I hadn’t expected in the southernmost city.

Lactose intolerance and dairy sensitivities have driven us to find substitutes to add to our coffee, tea and cereal. Many of us have found that we simply feel better without dairy and have sought alternatives in the form of soy, oat, almond, cashew, hemp and coconut milks, to name a few. to name a few, but are they healthy for us?

Imitation milkWhen it comes to conventional milk, a cow’s udder is pretty self-explanatory, but how do you milk oats? Soybeans, oats and other alternative sources become unrecognizable once they are “processed” and most of them would be unpalatable by our standards without the addition of additional sweeteners and flavorings. Food companies know we’d turn our noses up if these milk alternatives separate, as they’re likely to do naturally, so they’ve added emulsifiers and improved their texture to prevent that. In addition to emulsifiers, like gums and oils that prevent separation and make them smooth, minerals like calcium are added to fortify them.

All of these milks or “mylks” as they are sometimes called, are nothing new. One of the oldest alternatives to cow’s milk, or human milk for that matter, is soy milk. Soy milk has been around for nearly two thousand years and although it played a limited role in traditional Chinese diets, it was usually sweetened before consumption.

Ode to oat milkA bit newer to the world of dairy alternatives, oat milk has taken it by storm. Although oats are almost a complete protein, oat milk is quite viscous and, like its counterparts, also separates. To solve this problem, companies have turned to ever-popular gums like guar, gellan, or xanthan gum. A mainstream oat milk recipe calls for “low erucic acid” to thicken its product. Simply put, low erucic acid isn’t pure enough to even be called canola oil and has been linked to heart problems in animal studies. (The FDA limits the fatty acid profile of canola oil to two percent erucic acid. Low erucic acid is too high in – you guessed it – erucic acid to be called canola) .

Derived from rapeseed (which happens to be very toxic to humans), canola seeds are usually genetically modified to tolerate higher levels of pesticides and are treated with solvents when harvesting the oil. To make matters worse, canola oil is inflammatory…yum, exactly what I want in my coffee. Many of us seek out dairy alternatives to avoid lactose or to address chronic health issues and gut imbalances. Why, then, are these dairy alternatives filled with things that are considered “gut irritants” at the very least?

Emulsifiers are just one of the problems with some dairy alternatives. In addition to playing on our love for smooth, velvety textures, food companies serve our palettes with a plethora of flavors that tantalize our taste buds. As pumpkin spice season is upon us, these flavors are simply chemicals dancing on our taste buds and leaving imprints on our brains.

Assess exasperationLooking at all the additives in plant milks can make you throw up your hands in exasperation. That’s exactly what Lauren Abelin did when she was desperate for plant-based milk for her toddler son. First-time mom, Lauren had just moved to Hawaii a few months before she was born and dreamed of being a salt-of-the-earth mom – breastfeeding her son exclusively at first, then continuing to do so while implementing solid foods. . However, as her motherhood progressed, she realized that her son had a milk and soy allergy. “I took dairy and soy out of my diet, which wasn’t hard because I had done that before when dealing with my chronic health issue, and it helped,” Abelin recalls. . “But when I stopped producing enough milk to just breastfeed him, it was difficult because he was hungry. It wasn’t part of my plan and I felt like I had failed.

Lauren and her husband, Alex, scoured the grocery store aisles for alternatives for their son. They found little solace in the formulas, as everything contained dairy or soy. “It was infuriating that there were only soy and cow’s milk infant formulas on the market,” says Abelin. “[There was] nothing without soy [and] herbal that I could feed my baby. The couple went home to concoct their own solution. Enter Kiki milk.

Creating a healthy alternative with the help of nutritionists and doctors, Lauren finally found something she was comfortable feeding her son and decided she wanted to share with the world, but ran into it. to other dilemmas. “When you scale a product, it has to be accurate,” she says. “You have to have precise measurements to make it consistent every time.” She interviewed food scientists to analyze the breakdown of her product and received a lot of advice she hadn’t expected. “They told me many times to use the gummies and emulsifiers. They said it would be easier, it would be cheaper. And I said I didn’t care if it was cheaper or easier, that’s not the point. These food scientists argued that her customers wouldn’t like a product that separates. “They’ll be fine,” she counters. “They can shake it !”

Balanced specifically for growing children, Kiki Milk uses natural whole plant ingredients like oats, pumpkin seeds, coconut, hemp seeds, currants and seaweed (a natural source of calcium). It contains real flavors (like antioxidant-rich cocoa beans). Although expensive, the product is tested for residual pesticides like glyphosate, the weed killer used prodigiously in corn and other products, which has been found to be carcinogenic. Lauren learned so much during this endeavor and throughout our 45 minutes together, I learned too. When asked if there is competition in this space, she replies that she would love to! More competitive brands mean more options for healthy milk alternatives. His response seems to echo a resounding “Bring it on!”

Take away foodCow’s milk no longer has to be the gold standard. It can irritate our gut as much as anything and is inflammatory. There are healthy alternatives if we experience sensitivities to conventional dairy products. Fast, easy and convenient has become the new gold standard and with that comes hidden fare in the form of additives, chemicals, colorings and flavorings: things that make our foods deliciously addictive and make us crave. that smooth and sexy texture.

If we can’t directly control the ingredients of the things we eat, look for clean labels and small, simple ingredient lists. Finding alternatives that work for you is important and doable. Believe it or not, there are milks that only contain the milking ingredient and a little water…and they taste great! Just shake it and you’re in business. Maybe the food companies don’t want to strain our arms with all the jerking we’d have to do to keep the milks from separating, but a little arm workout never hurts.

(No Pumpkin Spice) Coconut Curry Soup

Ingredients

• 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil

• 1 large onion, diced

• 3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

• 1 small pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cubed (about 1½ pounds)

• 1 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cubed (about 1½ pounds)

• 2 bay leaves

• ½ teaspoon of nutmeg

• ½ teaspoon of ginger

• 2 tablespoons curry powder

• Salt and pepper (to taste)

• ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional for desired spice)

• 3 to 4 cups of chicken broth, depending on the desired consistency

• 3/4 can whole coconut milk (use creamy part first, then part milk, until desired consistency is achieved)

• Sage (for garnish)

• Pumpkin seeds (for garnish)

• Greek yogurt (optional, for garnish)

Method

Put the olive oil in a large saucepan and heat.

Add the onion and garlic and cook for about 5 minutes, or until translucent.

Add pumpkin, squash and bay leaves.

Add the spices, stirring while adding the chicken broth.

Cook the mixture for about 25 to 30 minutes or until tender.

Remove from heat and let cool.

Using an immersion blender, blend until smooth.

Add the coconut milk and return to the heat, stirring until you get the desired consistency.

Garnish with pumpkin seeds, sage (oven-roasted to make it delicious) and a dollop of yogurt, if desired.

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Erenzia Beauty celebrates Latin culture https://cacaovm.org/erenzia-beauty-celebrates-latin-culture/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/erenzia-beauty-celebrates-latin-culture/ Erenzia Beauty seeks to make waves in the industry by celebrating Latin culture through its line of vegan and cruelty-free products. Launched with an inaugural collection including shampoo, conditioner, leave-in treatment and fragrance, erenzia was developed by co-founders Alina Gonzalez, Vanessa Ramos and Alex Pearl. [Read more: Nexxus caters to at-home styling with hair care launches] […]]]>

Erenzia Beauty seeks to make waves in the industry by celebrating Latin culture through its line of vegan and cruelty-free products.

Launched with an inaugural collection including shampoo, conditioner, leave-in treatment and fragrance, erenzia was developed by co-founders Alina Gonzalez, Vanessa Ramos and Alex Pearl.

[Read more: Nexxus caters to at-home styling with hair care launches]

“We are passionate about creating a beauty experience that puts Latinas first by supporting, claiming and celebrating their unique authenticity, diversity and creativity,” said the brand and product co-founder. Alina Gonzalez. “Being a Latina-led company means having both the privilege and the responsibility to let ‘cultura’ guide the way erenzia beauty conducts business – from its sourcing practices, to its product, to its affiliate partners. “

With products that contain culture-enriched ingredients influenced by the heritage of Latin beauty rituals passed down from generation to generation, the line’s bespoke items are formulated to awaken the senses via decadent milks that transform into oils and contain nostalgic ingredients such as rice, corn, jojoba and cocoa, the company said.

“We want to create a product and an economic opportunity to support his personal and financial journey. erenzia beauty redefines a space that celebrates a sense of individual beauty and reinforces the importance of acknowledging one’s heritage and respecting others,” said the social selling co-founder. vanessa ramos.

[Read more: Olay quenches skin thirst with Regenerist Hyaluronic + Peptide 24 collection]

Erenzia’s hair care products are designed to nourish and enhance curls, curls and waves, as well as moisturize all hair types. Leave-in treatments aim to hydrate, smooth and replenish hair, while fragrances are formulated with sensual, romantic notes infused with cultural scents, the company said.

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Indigenous Peoples Day celebration embraces culture | New https://cacaovm.org/indigenous-peoples-day-celebration-embraces-culture-new/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/indigenous-peoples-day-celebration-embraces-culture-new/ Indigenous Peoples Day was celebrated at Titan Walk on Monday with performances, vendors, speakers and clubs showcasing Indigenous culture. California Governor Gavin Newsom proclaimed October 10 as Indigenous Peoples Day statewide to honor the rich diversity and contributions of Indigenous peoples. Cal State Fullerton’s celebration was coordinated by Jorge Contreras, the Program Coordinator for Native […]]]>

Indigenous Peoples Day was celebrated at Titan Walk on Monday with performances, vendors, speakers and clubs showcasing Indigenous culture.

California Governor Gavin Newsom proclaimed October 10 as Indigenous Peoples Day statewide to honor the rich diversity and contributions of Indigenous peoples. Cal State Fullerton’s celebration was coordinated by Jorge Contreras, the Program Coordinator for Native and Indigenous Peoples under the Vice President of Student Affairs.

Benjamin Hale, a member of the Navajo Nation, gave a speech and dance that focused on his family’s origins and how his people fought to keep their language, life, ceremonies and celebrations alive.

Hale spoke about the lack of American Indian history education in schools and how the courses that exist consist of culturally and historically insensitive information. He ended his speech with two dances, including a Native American swan dance with his two young daughters.

Another show was performed by Danza Azteca Xochipilli, a group that celebrates dance traditions in Native American and Mexican cultures.

OneDrumm, a band dedicated to sharing stories of healing, triumph, love and resilience through the beat of the drum, performed at the ceremony. According to the OneDrumm website, the drum is recognized as the heartbeat of Indigenous culture and is honored as a form of spiritual connection.

The final performance was HaLau Hula a Kawika Iaua Oh Leinani, a Polynesian dance group that showcases dance from Hawaii, Tahiti, Samoa, New Zealand and Tonga.

Event vendor Elena’s Creations sold traditional handmade jewelry, while Brown Hands Create sold pottery and art. Traditional bags, jewelry and art were available at Omeyacan Art.

Hungry guests could eat traditional Indian bread, burgers and tacos from Lucy Hale’s Indian Tacos, or try traditional Mexican dishes like mulitas and chilaquiles from Tlacopan Cocina Mexicana.

Among the main CSUF organizations present were the Intertribal Student Council, the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlan and Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science.

“A lot of young people are starting to embrace their Indigenous roots and connect to them a bit more,” Contreras said.

There will be a few webinars and workshops over the next few months, including a workshop with Titan Wellness discussing how to decolonize your diet and a collaboration with the Latinx Community Resource Center where a Mayan elder will talk about Mayan cosmology and traditional beverages with cocoa. There is a Native American Heritage Festival coming up on November 14, focusing more on American Indians and Native Americans in the United States.

CSUF currently does not have a resource center dedicated to Indigenous and Indigenous students.

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Woman-founded brand Erenzia Beauty celebrates Latina culture https://cacaovm.org/woman-founded-brand-erenzia-beauty-celebrates-latina-culture/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 12:50:57 +0000 https://cacaovm.org/woman-founded-brand-erenzia-beauty-celebrates-latina-culture/ Launching this Hispanic Heritage Month, erenzia beauty is a premium, vegan and cruelty-free beauty brand rooted in the celebration of Latina culture. The inaugural collection includes a range of shampoos, conditioners, leave-in treatments and fragrances, and is available for purchase online and through the brand’s enhanced “Amiga” affiliate partners. Putting Latinas First Developed by […]]]>
Launching this Hispanic Heritage Month, erenzia beauty is a premium, vegan and cruelty-free beauty brand rooted in the celebration of Latina culture.

The inaugural collection includes a range of shampoos, conditioners, leave-in treatments and fragrances, and is available for purchase online and through the brand’s enhanced “Amiga” affiliate partners.


Putting Latinas First

Developed by co-founders Alina Gonzalez, Vanessa Ramos and Alex Pearl, the company hopes to champion and encourage Latinas to own their beauty and step into their innate power emotionally, financially and socially through the enhanced “Amigas” affiliate partner business model. of the brand. .

As a holistic beauty brand founded and focused on social selling, erenzia beauty offers a unique opportunity for entrepreneurially motivated Latinas, as potential consumers and sellers. The enhanced “Amigas” affiliate partner business model offers modest, low-risk start-up costs, a strong community support network, and an arsenal of professional and personal development tools.

“We are passionate about creating a beauty experience that puts Latinas first by supporting, claiming and celebrating their unique authenticity, diversity and creativity,” said Brand & Product co-founder Alina Gonzalez. “Being a Latina-led company means having both the privilege and the responsibility to let ‘cultura’ guide the way erenzia beauty conducts business – from its sourcing practices, to its product, to its affiliate partners. “


About the products

erenzia beauty offers premium beauty products designed for Latinas, all available at an affordable price. The brand says the formulas are enriched with culture, influenced by history and infused with indigenous ingredients praised for their wellness properties, sensory attributes and inspired by the heritage of Latin beauty rituals passed down from generation to generation. .

Erenzia’s bespoke product line is formulated to “engage the senses and stir the soul” via milks that turn into oils, nostalgic ingredients such as rice, corn, jojoba and cocoa to elicit warm sensations and fragrances infused with sweetness, warmth, luminosity and spicy notes.

The new line of vegan and cruelty-free beauty products will include:

  • Hair care: erenzia Nourish to enhance curls, curls and waves with lightweight hydration and erenzia Hydrating for increased shine and softness for all hair types.
  • Leave-In Treatments: Oil Milk and Oil Cream leave-in treatments formulated with a distinct blend of traditional ingredients for the right balance of hydration, smoothing and regeneration.
  • Fragrances: Erenzia Captivating and Erenzia Sensual Long-Lasting Fragrance Oils are carefully formulated with sensual, romantic comfort and infused with nostalgic cultural scents.
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